Image Map Image Map
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 43

Thread: Bringing an old Seagate hard drive back to life?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    near frankfurt/m, germany
    Posts
    860

    Default

    Why reformating it? There is nothing more stable than a harddisk which already saves it's datas since about 30 years. There is no proove that newer media will last that long as this. For flash media it's already proven that it only last up to 10..15 years in powerless state, modern fast datacenter SSD even not much more than a halfyear. So an old 20 MB MFM drive is like written in stone.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,488
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    Half-inch magnetic tape. Good for 50 years at least.

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by itsvince725 View Post
    As for writing 360k disks with a 1.2MB drive...I was told it couldn't be done, but I haven't tried with actual 360k disks. Suppose it's worth a shot.
    Your success will likely be much better if you first format the 360k disks on the 360k drive and then write the data to them on the 1.2M drive.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  4. #14

    Default

    If you understand the problem, you will know what makes sense with the 360K and 1.2M. The 1.2M doesn't write the entire track width of a 360K. If the 360K had previous data on it before writing with the 1.2M, you won't clean all of the original 360K data. This will corrupt the read of 360K data on a 360K drive.
    One can format and write data on the 1.2M and read it on a 360K, if the disk was completely clean ( no data ). If one cleaned the disk first with a magnet is one way to do this. I've had good success with supper magnets and a sheet of steel. The trickiest part is to not snap the magnet to the disk over the steel or you'll dent the disk.
    You drag the magnet around the disk envelop. You have to remove the disk and rotate the disk to get the area that was at the envelop area. You also want to mark the magnet so you always use the same side. You don't want to make transitions on the disk by part one way and the rest another. You need to cover the entire area of the disk.
    That makes a 100% clean disk of no data. Formatting the disk on the 360K first doesn't erase the disk, it is writing data to the disk. That doesn't get cleaned by the narrower 1.2M head. If you have a 360K disk and a 1.2M, use the 1.2M as temporary storage only and not as the final disk.
    As an example, you might first format a disk on the 1.2M as a 360K. Mark that disk so you know it is only to be used in the 1.2M. You can then copy 360K material to it and then transfer it back to another 360K. Just remember to use it as a temporary storage only and it is only used in the 1.2M drive.
    Dwight

  5. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 6885P5H View Post
    Wow, am I lucky for once? I've never had a single issue writing 360k disks in 1.2M drives, and reading them back in 360k drives.
    In my experience it's only a problem with old full-height 360K drives. The newer half-height 360K drives usually have no problems reading 360K disks that were previously written to using 1.2MB drives.

  6. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    In my experience it's only a problem with old full-height 360K drives. The newer half-height 360K drives usually have no problems reading 360K disks that were previously written to using 1.2MB drives.
    Maybe you haven't experienced enough 360k/1.2M drive combinations because I have noticed the problem certainly does exist even when both drives are the newer HH models. It may not be a frequently observable issue but it does exist to some degree.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Posts
    3,152

    Default

    The only *mostly* sure way to write a 360k disk in a 1.2mb drive is to degauss it first then format/write it in the 1.2mb drive. But then if you write to it in the 360k drive, any additional writing in the 1.2mb drive may cause problems.

    Yes, a few 1.2mb drives do a slightly better job writing and a few 360k drives do a slightly better job reading, so some drive combinations may seem to work perfectly. But take your disks to some other random 360k drive and they may all be unreadable. None of the half height drives I have ever had much luck reading 360k disks written in 1.2mb drives, although they are a little more likely to get a read after a number of retries (but not when I need that file copied right NOW ).

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Quakertown, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    352

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Your success will likely be much better if you first format the 360k disks on the 360k drive and then write the data to them on the 1.2M drive.
    Yeah, I can do that with the Portable since it has a 1.2MB drive and a 360k drive, I boot up a 1.2MB DOS floppy and then format the 360k disk in drive B. But then my machine with a 1.2MB drive and a hard drive is a Super Socket 7 box running Windows 98 so I'm not sure about writing 360k floppies in that OS...

  9. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by itsvince725 View Post
    Yeah, I can do that with the Portable since it has a 1.2MB drive and a 360k drive, I boot up a 1.2MB DOS floppy and then format the 360k disk in drive B. But then my machine with a 1.2MB drive and a hard drive is a Super Socket 7 box running Windows 98 so I'm not sure about writing 360k floppies in that OS...
    Just boot it to DOS. Windows is easy enough to ignore.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,488
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    Or just find an old microwave, remove the magnets from the magnetron and build my eraser. Works every time, as far as I can tell.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •