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Thread: Millennium bug.

  1. #1

    Default Millennium bug.

    Ok... at last it happened! I found a millennium bugged computer on my way!
    The issue is in the BIOS... if I change the date in DOS, it works flawlessly but, after a new boot, the date is completely out... Obviously changing the date in the BIOS is useless...
    I tried to look over the Internet but I have not found anything helpful and I do not think I can find a new BIOS...
    Do somebody have any solution? Like a DOS program that translate the date?

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default

    The Commodore PC10-III only supports two digit years and is not Y2K compliant. I worked around it by creating a script and using a couple programs to take the date stored in the RTC and up-convert it to a modern year. You can read about it, along with the script, at the following URL:

    http://www.amibay.com/showthread.php...10-III-Project

    Heather

  3. #3

    Default

    It would be useful to know what type of computer you have.

    For example, is it an Olivetti M24 aka AT&T PC6300?

    "It's a me-too, 8-bit machine with good graphics and a disk system nobody will support."
    -- Bill Gates, about the Sony SMC-70 with the new 3.5" floppy drives (InfoWorld; June 7, 1982)

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ahm View Post
    It would be useful to know what type of computer you have.

    For example, is it an Olivetti M24 aka AT&T PC6300?
    It is not a branded computer.
    It is simply an assembled computer:
    Adaptec AHA-1542CF/1540CF
    Aska SST2845E
    Chaintech CL-9028 VLB 2 Mb
    Creative SB16 CT4170
    "generic" motherboard SIMILAR to an AQUARIUS SYSTEMS MB-4DUVC MODEL 1
    CPU Intel 80486DX2-S 66 MHz
    16 Mb RAM
    generica 200W PSU
    1 FDD 3 da 1.44 Mb
    1 FDD 5 da 1.2 Mb
    1 Samsung WNR-31601A (1.6 Gb)
    1 WD Caviar 2120 (125 Mb) on a drawer

    Thanx

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
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    New Jersey, USA
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    Default

    I haven't come across this issue myself yet, but I expect to eventually. When that happens I have two approaches in mind:

    1. use a utility invoked in autoexec.bat to fetch the correct time/date from another system on the network. assuming such a utility exists (or can be written).

    2. rewind the year to something that works well. For example, 1985 is a good choice if you want the days of the week to match (April 25 fell on a Thursday in 1985, just like it has in 2019). 1969 is a good choice if you want an easy rule but don't care about weekdays falling on the correct dates (year - 50 is pretty easy), as long as the system you're using can handle it.

    If the BIOS date is always offset after a reboot by a consistent amount, another option is to write a utility to adjust the date by that amount, again invoking it from autoexec.bat.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default

    A VLB motherboard that's ignorant of Y2K? Wow, there's a lack of foresight.

    You can probably fix the mess with a BIOS update, if you can find one. If you use a third-party utility to set the RTC, does the BIOS try to reset it on boot?

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kgober View Post
    I haven't come across this issue myself yet, but I expect to eventually. When that happens I have two approaches in mind:

    1. use a utility invoked in autoexec.bat to fetch the correct time/date from another system on the network. assuming such a utility exists (or can be written).

    2. rewind the year to something that works well. For example, 1985 is a good choice if you want the days of the week to match (April 25 fell on a Thursday in 1985, just like it has in 2019). 1969 is a good choice if you want an easy rule but don't care about weekdays falling on the correct dates (year - 50 is pretty easy), as long as the system you're using can handle it.

    If the BIOS date is always offset after a reboot by a consistent amount, another option is to write a utility to adjust the date by that amount, again invoking it from autoexec.bat.
    At the moment I have decided for your second option. At the moment I have put 1996 since the day of the week is the same as 2019... I have to check if I can go back to 1985... let's cross the fingers...

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    A VLB motherboard that's ignorant of Y2K? Wow, there's a lack of foresight.

    You can probably fix the mess with a BIOS update, if you can find one. If you use a third-party utility to set the RTC, does the BIOS try to reset it on boot?
    Since I do not know the exact type of the mobo I cannot search for a suitable update! But I am going to look for Aquarius VLB BIOS update... it could be I am lucky! My mobo could be simply a different revision than the one I have found... they are veeeeeery similar...
    The BIOS does not reset... simply it does not accept a beyond 2000 year... it reset time/date only... I have not checked if there are some rules... if I remember well it simply changes to 2099 with "certain" month, day, time...

  9. #9
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    There are several third-party tools that write the RTC date directly. It's not rocket science.

  10. #10

    Default

    The other option is to lie to the computer. Why does it need to know what date it really is.
    Dwight

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