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Thread: Kaypro II repairs

  1. #1

    Default Kaypro II repairs

    Did a few repairs on my newly-acquired Kaypro II today.

    First repair was resoldering the connector on the power supply, as the joints were all cracked and broken on it, resulting in intermittent issues.

    Here's a before:

    thumbnail_IMG_4652.jpg

    I had actually already sucked the solder off of a few when I took this picture, but I outlined the ones that were still untouched, which is what they all looked like.

    Here is after:

    thumbnail_IMG_4660.jpg

    Much better! All intermittent problems have also vanished!

    Second was the latch on the A: drive. These Tandon drives are kind of notorious for this problem, and this one was no exception. When I went to go take the disk out last night, it gave up on life. Thankfully I had a spare non-working drive that was similar, so I took the necessary parts from that, and was able to successfully repair the Kaypro's drive!

    It's a bit tough to get the drives out of a Kaypro II, as there's not much clearance between the left side screws and the CRT. I ended up having to use vice grips to remove the screws on that side, since I didn't have a screwdriver that was short enough. That actually worked out surprisingly well, which is good, because I did NOT feel like removing the entire CRT.

    Here's some shots of it all back together and working

    thumbnail_IMG_4666.jpg

    thumbnail_IMG_4665.jpg

    I sure do like this thing. I'm really digging CP/M also! The games made entirely out of ASCII characters are also super fun

    This machine was definitely not made for games, which is one of the things I love about it. I like things that people got serious work done with in the past, and the Kaypro is exactly that. In other words, this machine was no "toy" when it was new.

  2. #2
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    Heh. You had exactly the same experience I did when I bought a Kaypro II.

  3. #3

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    It's the part of the latch that holds the pin that cracks and breaks. I have two drives like that. On the other hand, there are people who have drawn up 3D models of this part and there is a discussion about it here, if you are interested:

    https://stardot.org.uk/forums/viewto...p?f=45&t=16686

    Kaypro looks good. Particularly the keyboard - the pin stripes round the bottom are often worn through long usage. Well done on the repair!

  4. #4
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    There are a couple of things you will need do to prevent the other Floppy Hinge part from breaking. Pick up a length
    of 3/32 Brass Rod and 1/8" brass Rod. Cut those to make full length parts for the door hinge. Remove the two short
    white Nylon pins, and replace those with the 3/32" Brass Rod. The 1/8" brass is used in the larger holes to make a
    Door Hinge that will last for years. (Here is my Latch Part I put on Thingiverse.)

    https://www.thingiverse.com/search?q...15cd414177f9f5

    If the Floppy's need lubricant on the Head Guide Rods, use Dri-Slide, a Motorcycle Cable Lubricant, that does not
    attract dirt and makes the heads glide for years. It only takes a couple of drops, so a can will be a lifetime supply.

    Also, if you want to use a GOTEK as a Floppy Replacement, those are available on EBAY. They can be programmed with
    the HxC Firmware or the Keir's FlashFloppy Firmware. These use a USB Type Flash Drive for storage, with multiple
    images on a USB Flash Drive. So, you could have 100+ Images on a USB Flashdrive, and toggle the image you want to
    Boot.

    https://github.com/keirf/FlashFloppy
    https://github.com/keirf/FlashFloppy/wiki
    http://hxc2001.free.fr/floppy_drive_emulator/

    Larry

  5. #5

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    Thanks for replying everyone!

    KC9UDX, so your Kaypro had these exact problems? Interesting indeed! Guess these are fairly common problems for these machines.


    JonB, the 3D printed parts are very interesting! Definitely good to know those exist. And yes, the keyboard is in very nice shape, and I also got lucky since this one uses more standard mechanical switches instead of the Keytronic ones which use foam pads that rot.


    Idkraemer, some very good info there! Iíve thought about a GOTEK, but I sure do like real floppies. Still considering it though.

  6. #6
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    Yes, I had exactly the same problems.

  7. #7
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    I had the same problem on two kaypro 4/84's. Someone coating the power supply pins in solder making the connection to tight and when the connector was pushed on it caused breaks in the solder like yours. Easy fix, and I sucked off all the extra solder. Wonder why its so common on the kaypros.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by VERAULT View Post
    I had the same problem on two kaypro 4/84's. Someone coating the power supply pins in solder making the connection to tight and when the connector was pushed on it caused breaks in the solder like yours. Easy fix, and I sucked off all the extra solder. Wonder why its so common on the kaypros.
    Not really sure about that. May have something to do with the fact that it’s a single-sided board, so there’s not as much support (solder) as there would be on a double-sided board.

  9. #9

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    Well, if you saw my other thread, you’ll know that my B: drive was missing the felt pressure pad! I believe I have fixed the problem though. I’ve got a new piece of felt glued in there, and so far, so good.

  10. #10

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    By the way, here's what I'm using to write disks for the Kaypro:


    thumbnail_IMG_4670.jpg


    My trusty Compaq Portable. I download the files on a modern computer, put them on a 720KB disk, put that in the Compaq, write the files to a Kaypro formatted 5.25" floppy and put that into the Kaypro 720KB goes a long way with Kaypro files.

    One of the things that worried me in the past about buying a Kaypro was how to get software for it. I sure felt dumb when I looked it up and realized how easy it really was!

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