Image Map Image Map
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Bricked 1084-D Monitor. Any likely (fixable) culprits?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    2,377

    Default Bricked 1084-D Monitor. Any likely (fixable) culprits?

    So, this evening I fetched the 1084-D monitor that came with the Amiga 1000 (... I probably need to pass on to a loving home one of these days...) out of storage hoping I could use it in RGBI mode with my new Tandy 1000 EX. However, upon plugging it in I've discovered that it seems to be completely dead; the power button seems to click positively but the LED above it doesn't even flicker and I don't hear any "electrical sounds" or humming from the monitor.

    Do these monitors have a fuse that's known to blow or other low-hanging fruit fix, or is it likely kaput enough that it's not worth repairing? I don't think I'm up for swapping a flyback or other heroic measures for a monitor which *did* work a couple years ago for a few hours but I otherwise don't know the history of.

  2. #2

    Default

    Perhaps. But, IME, they're more frequently known for having power switches that fail.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Posts
    3,483

    Default

    Ditto on the power switch. Only problem is, no one makes suitable replacements. You will just have to solder some wire so it is always "on", and then use a switched power strip if you need to turn it on and off.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    2,377

    Default

    Great. I guess when I get a chance I'll try hotwiring around the power switch and see where that gets me. Anyone have a lead on a service manual or whatnot that'd give me hints on getting the hood off?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Toronto ON Canada
    Posts
    7,349

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SomeGuy View Post
    Ditto on the power switch. Only problem is, no one makes suitable replacements. You will just have to solder some wire so it is always "on", and then use a switched power strip if you need to turn it on and off.
    FWIW, a lot of old AT power supplies used the same or similar switch.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    2,377

    Default

    The monitor is kind of a beater in terms of physical condition so I probably wouldn't feel too guilty replacing the switch with something improvised if that actually fixes the problem.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio USA
    Posts
    436

    Default

    I had a similar issue with my 1902A monitor when I pulled it rom storage. At least on the 1902A, I needed a signal coming in for it to switch on. I had that, but the slide switches to choose modes were dirty/corroded. Flicking them back and forth several times got it working.
    PCjr, DTK PC-XT Turbo, 386DX 33, 486 laptop, Pentium 120, Pentium III 500, various old laptops, Commodore Colt, all working. I also have a 286 that I need to see if I can repair.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    UK, South East
    Posts
    398
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    There is a chap on Amibay selling replacement 1084 switches - just search for '1084 switches'

    They are quite straightforward to fit.

    Have you done the basics like checking the fuse in the plug and whipped the back cover off to check mainboard fuse ?

    More challenging issues like a failed flyback usually result in a whining sound coming from the monitor with no picture.

    **EDIT**
    Just spotted yours is a 1084D - the Amibay switches are for 1084-S variants as I recall.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    2,377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zippysticks View Post
    Have you done the basics like checking the fuse in the plug and whipped the back cover off to check mainboard fuse ?
    It's a US-spec monitor with a standard... I-forget-the-name-of-it computer power supply-style power jack so there's no plug fuse. When I get the top off it I'll look around and see if there's a replaceable fuse on the board somewhere.

    Have to say it's pretty darn confusing just how many 1084 variants there are out there in the wild. Makes it something of a challenge searching for a service manual or the like.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    UK, South East
    Posts
    398
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eudimorphodon View Post
    It's a US-spec monitor with a standard... I-forget-the-name-of-it computer power supply-style power jack so there's no plug fuse. When I get the top off it I'll look around and see if there's a replaceable fuse on the board somewhere.

    Have to say it's pretty darn confusing just how many 1084 variants there are out there in the wild. Makes it something of a challenge searching for a service manual or the like.
    I presume its an IEC power input socket then....

    Pretty good visual guide to the Commodore monitor models here:

    https://gona.mactar.hu/Commodore/mon...el_number.html

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •