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Thread: Cutting down ISA Riser Card

  1. #1

    Default Cutting down ISA Riser Card

    I am working on a custom pc. I have height limitations and I need to cut down an ISA riser card from 3 slots to 2. Is this as simple as cutting off the extra slot or do I need to solder connections?

  2. #2
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    Unless there are components (ICs, resistors, etc.) on the part that you intend to discard, you should be fine just cutting off the excess. ISA slots usually just parallel one another on riser cards. Warm up the bandsaw!

  3. #3
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    Make sure you take some sand paper and deburr the edges. It is possible some copper traces may tear and possibly short with other exposed copper such as internal power and ground planes. If you smooth the edges after cutting, that should never happen.
    "Good engineers keep thick authoritative books on their shelf. Not for their own reference, but to throw at people who ask stupid questions; hoping a small fragment of knowledge will osmotically transfer with each cranial impact." - Me

  4. #4

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    Actually, I'm using a table saw! Thanks guys. I was thinking about using kapton tape, silicone, or hot glue on the top, where I cut to "seal" it.

  5. #5
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    Hmmm, I don't know if I'd use a table saw--unless you're using a very fine-toothed (or no-toothed diamond) plywood blade, you're running the danger of raising chips on the board. And an FR4 circuit board will not be kind to your blade's teeth either--it's pretty abrasive because of the glass fiber embedded within. If you have to use a table saw because that's all you have, sandwich the board between two pieces of wood and don't raise the blade more than the thickness of the board. I speak from experience. :{ Even my cherished 80 tooth Freud carbide blade raised chips--and it normally gives a glassy finish on wood cuts.

    Use a fine-toothed hacksaw if you want, a jeweler's frame saw, or a fine-toothed bandsaw. An abrasive cutoff wheel might also work.

    A sharp file held at a slight angle will clean the edge of the board up.

  6. #6

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    Ok, I'll use my grinder with a cut-off wheel.

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