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Thread: Anoyone use Dial-Up connections Anymore?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Central VA
    Posts
    4,410

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    If you want to do everything yourself and use real modems, this is one way:

    http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...Line-Simulator

    You can also use a small PBX or two POTS lines, but a used line simulator is probably the cheapest.

    You can also get an account on SDF (sdf.org) and use their PPP dialup service:

    https://sdf.org/?faq?DIALUP?01

    I believe they still allow shell access, too.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Galaxian View Post
    What I (and perhaps some other folks) would like to know is that; now that dial-up is mostly disused, due to less network activity, is it more reliable/faster?
    I've been tempted to get a dial-up service as a backup (I live in a 4G only zone, no other options but dial-up) but I just don't know if it'd be worth it.
    At a maximum download speed of around 4kbs, a modern-day web page would just about choke down anything trying to access it through a 56k modem...

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Galaxian View Post
    What I (and perhaps some other folks) would like to know is that; now that dial-up is mostly disused, due to less network activity, is it more reliable/faster? I've been tempted to get a dial-up service as a backup (I live in a 4G only zone, no other options but dial-up) but I just don't know if it'd be worth it.
    I have set up an ISDN connection around 2007, and even the very weak and heavily overloaded 3G network was much faster for downloading a decent web browser. For e-mail (the main purpose), it was okay.

    That said, dial-up is like connecting a shower through a straw: No matter how bad the piping is, the straw will be the main problem. Dial-up speed and reliability are limited by the quality of your phone line, not by the load in the ISP's network.

    In Europe, the telephony system is moving to VoIP technology, which prevents modems from working reliably at all (due to timing issues). A semi-stable 9600 bps link can be achieved with a bit of luck, otherwise it is down to 1200 bps if the modems connect at all. While GSM is a reliable alternative (at 9600 bps), it is going to be shut down in the next years. Here, 56k dial-up has become a dream already.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Florida, United States
    Posts
    16

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    Well, I half expected those answers. It's somewhat of a shame, I'm sure a lot of us have a certain nostalgia for the song of the modem.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Galaxian View Post
    ... I'm sure a lot of us have a certain nostalgia for the song of the modem.
    Think there's more nostalgia for the way the internet used to be (when it was "young and innocent"). The sound of the modem itself, however, likely drove many folks (including myself) nuts.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Fairfield, Ohio
    Posts
    406

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    Quote Originally Posted by T-R-A View Post
    Think there's more nostalgia for the way the internet used to be (when it was "young and innocent"). The sound of the modem itself, however, likely drove many folks (including myself) nuts.
    In certain ways I preferred Fido-net. The star topology made it easy to lock out trolls from the local net. It's amazing what you could accomplish on a BBS without a GUI. About the time I got out of Fido-net Excalibur had appeared, but it seemed a real PITA to set up. The other issue was Windows 3.x's cooperative multi-tasking didn't play well with BBS systems. It's true some sysops did tweak Windows so that it ran well, but most sysops without a dedicated BBS machine went different routes. I used DesqView/386 myself, and OS/2 was quite popular. I finally broke down and joined the GUI brigade with Win95 since it used pre-emptive interrupt driven multitasking. Interesting thing is that 32-bit NT console applications worked quite nicely under '95. All I needed to so after upgrading the OS was drop the NT .exe over the MS-DOS file. All the configuration & data files stayed the same.

    ...An LGR video I watched recently made me wonder: is it possible to telnet into a modern (9x or later) Windows system via serial port? At least for transferring files & such?

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey View Post
    In certain ways I preferred Fido-net. The star topology made it easy to lock out trolls from the local net. It's amazing what you could accomplish on a BBS without a GUI.
    Both FidoNet and BBS systems are still around and work fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by Casey View Post
    I finally broke down and joined the GUI brigade with Win95 since it used pre-emptive interrupt driven multitasking.
    There is pre-emptive multitasking for DOS applications and cooperative multitasking for GUI applications. No change from Windows 3.1, but newer applications tended to behave slightly better, with the concept of multi-threading being supported.

    Quote Originally Posted by Casey View Post
    ...An LGR video I watched recently made me wonder: is it possible to telnet into a modern (9x or later) Windows system via serial port? At least for transferring files & such?
    Windows NT came with the RAS services, allowing one to dial in. Otherwise, there was HyperTerminal (or any other software) which could do those things. I know people who run a BBS on Windows 7/10.

  8. #18

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    I've got a dial-up setup running in my house. Avaya Definity PBX facilitates dialing/ringing (not the cheapest or easiest way to achieve this, something like an Avaya Partner/ACS, or a Panasonic KXTES824E are a bit more plug-and-play). An old Pentium 4 PC running Linux with a bunch of serial ports and external modems, mgetty (for dialup shell access) and pppd (for dialup networking) handles answering those modems and authentication.
    EDIT: for clarification, I can only get 33.6kbps links, consumer modems on analog lines can only achieve 33.6k, you need a digital line and special modem on the server end to achieve 56k link.
    IMG_1703.jpgIMG_1485.jpgIMG_1764.jpg
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJndYm6OW_Y
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGOGLezCuBk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLkINlXCd7c
    Last edited by RWallmow; June 10th, 2019 at 05:32 AM. Reason: see edit
    My Vintage computer/blog site
    Searching for a keyboard for a WYSEpc WY-1100.

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