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Thread: Anoyone use Dial-Up connections Anymore?

  1. #1

    Default Anoyone use Dial-Up connections Anymore?

    Yes, They were sucky in the mid to late 90's when we were stuck with them. (especially me growing up with the painfully slow 5 Kbps download rate of songs on napster). BUT, as dumb as it may sound, I am putting together the same workstation I had as a kid right down to puky dial-up, mediocre late 90's PC, and windows ME. Just to enjoy the BSOD once again.

    So my question is, after all these years, is there a way to essentially "dial up" to a home broadband router over wifi or Ethernet? Is there some network adapter to do this.

    Aside from re-living my teen years listening to peal-jam on Napster and Instant messaging my girlfriend at the time over MSN messenger (who is now my wife) using dial up. This sort of network adapter would be also useful in connecting older PC's to the internet if they only have a modem (Which I have a few laptops of the time I'm working on).

    Any Thoughts? Thanks!!

    Mods, sorry if my question is in the work section, please move it if so. Thanks.

  2. #2

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    I think I actually have a Netgear RM356 (if I am remembering right) that was a router that used a modem for its WAN connection...

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    My ISP still offers me a dialup login even though I'm on their fiber plan. I'm alotted two hours worth of connection time each month and can dial in from any of their local numbers. Yes, I occasionally use it when I do not have access to wi-fi.
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  4. #4

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    Far more on dial-up than you'd think. There are areas in the county I live not served by Cable or DSL. Satellite is too expensive (not to mention the caps), and that leaves about a good 1/3 with dial-up or nothing. I'm one of the fortunate few on what AT&T euphemistically calls U-Verse. What they don't tell you is that the distance to my house limits me to about a 3MB connection. Barely passable DSL speed.

  5. #5
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    You might be more likely to have a faster speed on your phone when broadband internet on your computer in the unpopulated areas of the country.
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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    You might be more likely to have a faster speed on your phone when broadband internet on your computer in the unpopulated areas of the country.
    Maybe....if there were any towers close enough to get a signal. Literally just 1 bar (and no 4G) on my cell phone at home.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeXT View Post
    My ISP still offers me a dialup login even though I'm on their fiber plan. I'm alotted two hours worth of connection time each month and can dial in from any of their local numbers. Yes, I occasionally use it when I do not have access to wi-fi.
    I wish most ISP's would offer this.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by tblake05 View Post
    So my question is, after all these years, is there a way to essentially "dial up" to a home broadband router over wifi or Ethernet? Is there some network adapter to do this.
    The network adapter is your serial port - you can use a null-modem cable to connect to another machine. Apart from a PPP server (such as pppd or slirp), the other machine can also pretend to be a modem. The required software is small enough to install on a router, otherwise a Raspberry Pi (or similar) will do just perfect.

    I have used slirp to connect Windows 3.1 running inside DOSBox to the internet, with the host tunneling PPP over TCP. As far as Internet Explorer 3 (which has a decent dialer) was concerned, it was a true dial-up connection.

    Quote Originally Posted by tblake05 View Post
    This sort of network adapter would be also useful in connecting older PC's to the internet if they only have a modem (Which I have a few laptops of the time I'm working on).
    It is not easily possible to connect two modems directly to each other, since they require the telephone line voltage. There are simple circuits providing these 48~105 volts (up to 135 V when ringing). After the connection is established, you only get a transparent link (similar to a null-modem cable), though. A null-modem cable is easier to deal with.

    Quote Originally Posted by tblake05 View Post
    Aside from re-living my teen years listening to peal-jam on Napster and Instant messaging my girlfriend at the time over MSN messenger
    Keep in mind that even the internet of the late 90's did not require downloading dozens of megabytes just to show a bit of text and could deal with bad connections. The dial-up experience with today's web is borderline painful - modern tech giants with stable GbE-links simply do not care. While many developing countries (e.g. most parts of Africa) never had dial-up technology (because no telephone infrastructure), they now rely on satellite links with limited bandwidth and high packet loss. The latter simply breaks modern web applications.

  9. #9
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    As far as I know, you can set up your own home ISP simulator using a PBX connected to some modems, with the modems connected to a system (Unix or Linux most likely) providing PPP or SLIP. Used PBX systems are fairly easy to find used, or you can build yourself a software-based PBX using software like Asterisk, running on a PC with a couple of POTS line cards.

    I haven't ever done any of this myself, but I understand it's possible.

  10. #10
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    What I (and perhaps some other folks) would like to know is that; now that dial-up is mostly disused, due to less network activity, is it more reliable/faster?
    I've been tempted to get a dial-up service as a backup (I live in a 4G only zone, no other options but dial-up) but I just don't know if it'd be worth it.

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