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Thread: Unknown Early PCBs (late 1960s)

  1. #11
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  2. #12
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    It's hard to say without seeing the whole board, but the second with the pulse transformers looks to be a driver for (core) memory.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinw View Post
    "DM" == "Data Machines" which was sold to Varian

    They are boards for a Varian 620i

    http://bitsavers.org/pdf/varian/620i

    v620.jpg

  4. #14
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    Ah, so the second is exactly what I thought it was--a DM104, core driver board cf. Chapter 3

    Good spotting, Al--the 620i used to pretty common.

  5. #15
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    Wow, I knew you guys would work it out

    Thank you very much!

    Martin

  6. #16
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    I thought I’d mention this in my other computer forum in case they’re interested.

    https://stardot.org.uk/forums/viewto...p?f=45&t=17262

    Does anybody have one of these, or experiences of them?

    Thank you again, what a resource.

    Martin

  7. #17
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    So I have a DM104 Core Memory Driver Switch PCB (with the pulse transformers (not the ICs)) and a DM122 Multiply Divide and Extended Address PCB (with the old TI SSI ICs).

    Varian 620i Cards.jpg

    Only 24 more cards to find

    It really is amazing that basically they were building microprocessors (the equivalent of) with discrete SSI ICs in the 60s.

    Just goes to show in engineering it's quite often evolution rather than revolution that paves the way.

    Cheers,

    Martin

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