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Thread: Manual for ProLinea (Enhanced) Desktop Family

  1. #1

    Default Manual for ProLinea (Enhanced) Desktop Family

    Hi and thank You for reply in advance
    I am looking for manuals, and all info about for probably:
    ProLinea (Enhanced) Desktop Family
    Computer: ProLinea 4/66
    System Board:
    Assembly 003760
    Spare Part
    164560-001
    IMG_5763_m.jpg
    IMG_5767_m.jpg
    IMG_5768_m.jpg

    The SOFTPAQ NUMBER is: SP16085?

    BTW: Maybe You known why this board have a train on it? Just curious.

    This Compaq have unusal VGA, with blocked some pins. Can I attach usual VGA LCD monitor to it, just removing pins from cable? The old CRT one is quite dark, and it is now hard to find someone in my country to repair it.

    What is maximum Ram for it, and which Pentium Overdrive(currently probably 486)?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgru2 View Post
    BTW: Maybe You known why this board have a train on it? Just curious.
    Not sure I'm following you ... define "train" please.

    Pentium OD's on Compaq machines were sometimes a crap-shoot. If it already has a 486DX2-66, their would be little gained with a POD-83.

  3. #3

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    Thank You for reply.
    By "train" I think about "locomotive" drawing near the VLSI chip.

    About Pentium OD - just to ask directly, if I install it in this machine, can I run Settlers III?

  4. #4
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    It was common in those days for Compaq to include a small picture as part of a board's silk-screening. I would guess that the picture might relate in some way to the product's code name during development, but I really don't know for sure.

    When VGA was first introduced, there were some unused pins in the connector. The pins in the plug were missing, and the corresponding holes in the socket were filled. This prevented you from plugging something in in the wrong place. Over time, uses for the extra pins were found and today VGA connectors include all 15 pins.

    If you have an old VGA monitor (one that did only the basic VGA resolutions of 640x400 and 640x480) it might have the correct missing pins to fit the socket. Otherwise, you can get yourself a VGA extension cable and just break off the pins that are blocked. Don't break the pins off of a monitor cable because that might prevent you from using the monitor later on another system that uses the extra pins (unless you know for sure that your monitor doesn't use them). Using an extension cable for this is a safe way to break off pins because the original cable is left untouched.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgru2 View Post
    Thank You for reply.
    By "train" I think about "locomotive" drawing near the VLSI chip.

    About Pentium OD - just to ask directly, if I install it in this machine, can I run Settlers III?
    Compaq had some weird in-house logos on their motherboards of that era. Usually something like that is for manufacturer-use and doesn't really affect the board (like a revision change)

    From what's listed about the game you refer to, it mentions a Pentium being required. Realize that an Overdrive processor is more or less a shoehorned Pentium into a 486-socket, so performance would be lacking at best. If it's playing that game that's your goal, I'd personally look for a true P1 or P2-based machine. You'll likely be disappointed with the performance of the POD.

  6. #6

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    Thanks for reply.

    Playing Settlers III on this machine is just one of the goals. Generally it did(when the BIOS battery was good, now it's time to change battery) what it had to do - play Settlers II, use modem connection and browse Internet , and use floppy.
    I just want to have a backup "floppy machine", especially for 5,25 floppies from my Elwro 800 Jr microcomputer and probably 8 inch floppy drive(if I find someone who can check, make a power source for it, and eventually change some of 7xxx chips that this floppy drive have)

    Is playing a Pentium game, like Settlers III on Pentium OD just similar to playing Settlers on Amiga without expanded Ram? Maybe the perfomance won't be so bad for me, I used Atari with cassette player in past... What about overclocking - maybe is there some safe way, of using e.g. water, and achieving better speed? Or just it wasn't projected for overclocking?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgru2 View Post
    Is playing a Pentium game, like Settlers III on Pentium OD just similar to playing Settlers on Amiga without expanded Ram? Maybe the perfomance won't be so bad for me, I used Atari with cassette player in past... What about overclocking - maybe is there some safe way, of using e.g. water, and achieving better speed? Or just it wasn't projected for overclocking?
    You're dealing with a machine that's 25+ years old. Those types of machines were designed for business applications, not for gaming. There's no provision in the BIOS to change frequencies and no real method to overclock. You're best option is to use it for what it was meant for....a 486/66...and find a cheap Pentium on Ebay to play your game.

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