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Thread: IBM XT build almost finished!

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malc View Post
    I have a generic 16-bit IDE/Floppy controller in one of my XT's and use the XTIDE Universal Bios with a HD floppy bios appended to the XUB, which allows me to use CF connected to the 16-bit IDE and 1.44Mb floppy disks,
    I see. Cool stuff!
    Compaq - “It simply works better”

  2. #12
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    The Tandon may be more appropriate to the original build, but it wasn't uncommon to see half-height drives in these original XT/AT machines as upgrades as soon as they came out, even if the colours didn't match.

    Personally, I'd be happy as long as the colour matches. There's a plethora of old Pentium 4's and early Core2 machines that are now being retired and recycled from which one could grab a stack of black floppy drives from, since you've got a 2HD controller anyways. Then just spraypaint a 3.5" to 5.25" drive bay adapter to match, and you're good to go.
    My vintage systems: Tandy 1000 HX, Tandy 1000 RSX, and some random Pentium in a Hewitt Rand chassis...

    Some people keep a classic car in their garage. Some people keep vintage computers. The latter hobby is cheaper, usually takes less space, and is less likely to lead to a fatal accident.

  3. #13

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    I do already have a black drive, but no black adapter. I’d rather just buy the proper black one, as last time I painted one (for a 5150), it stayed sticky and the whole machine smelled of spray paint for months.

    If it were metal you could bake it to remedy all of this, but you can’t really do that on plastic.
    Compaq - “It simply works better”

  4. #14

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    My mouse came in a few days ago:

    thumbnail_IMG_4876.jpgthumbnail_IMG_4877.jpg

    Very cool mouse!


    I also picked up another pretty cool accessory for it:

    thumbnail_IMG_4878.jpgthumbnail_IMG_4879.jpg

    I've been after a nice 5153 for ages. I was very worried it would show up in pieces like almost every other 5153 that has ever been shipped, but it was packed extremely well!

    Now need to find a 5154!
    Compaq - “It simply works better”

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by compaqportableplus View Post
    I do already have a black drive, but no black adapter. I’d rather just buy the proper black one, as last time I painted one (for a 5150), it stayed sticky and the whole machine smelled of spray paint for months.

    If it were metal you could bake it to remedy all of this, but you can’t really do that on plastic.
    What kind of paint did you use? I tend to use Tremclad or ArmourCoat enamel based paints, because that's what I keep on hand for welding projects and repairs.
    My vintage systems: Tandy 1000 HX, Tandy 1000 RSX, and some random Pentium in a Hewitt Rand chassis...

    Some people keep a classic car in their garage. Some people keep vintage computers. The latter hobby is cheaper, usually takes less space, and is less likely to lead to a fatal accident.

  6. #16

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    It was some kind of rustoleum from what I remember.
    Compaq - “It simply works better”

  7. #17

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    The best way to colour plastics is to use vinyl dye, often sold as bumper paint. Rather than sitting on the surface of the plastic, changing its texture, it seeps in and dyes it. I've done a few computer parts that way and it works great.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by compaqportableplus View Post
    It was some kind of rustoleum from what I remember.
    Interesting... I assume you did multiple light coats, rather than trying to put it all on at once?
    My vintage systems: Tandy 1000 HX, Tandy 1000 RSX, and some random Pentium in a Hewitt Rand chassis...

    Some people keep a classic car in their garage. Some people keep vintage computers. The latter hobby is cheaper, usually takes less space, and is less likely to lead to a fatal accident.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackepyon View Post
    Interesting... I assume you did multiple light coats, rather than trying to put it all on at once?
    I’m pretty sure I did, but it was about three or four years ago, so I may have been stupid and just blasted it all on at once. I have since restored several antique electric fans, and gained much more experience with spray paint.

    Maybe I’ll have a go at practicing on some junk plastic parts again.


    Okay, so I’ve found a good deal on a couple of untested full-height floppy drives, so at least one should work. They aren’t IBM branded, but my ST-412 isn’t either, so I don’t care.

    What I’ve decided to do for some extra storage on this thing is add an XT-IDE with an externally-accessible CF card alongside the ST-412. That’ll make data transfer quick and painless, without sacrificing my beautiful ST-412 hard drive.
    Last edited by compaqportableplus; July 11th, 2019 at 07:02 PM.
    Compaq - “It simply works better”

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by compaqportableplus View Post
    ...I may have been stupid and just blasted it all on at once.
    It's an EXTREMELY easy mistake to make. Patience is the key. Just a light coat, wait an hour, then try again.
    My vintage systems: Tandy 1000 HX, Tandy 1000 RSX, and some random Pentium in a Hewitt Rand chassis...

    Some people keep a classic car in their garage. Some people keep vintage computers. The latter hobby is cheaper, usually takes less space, and is less likely to lead to a fatal accident.

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