Image Map Image Map
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Does anyone know what computer this CPU was used in?

  1. #1

    Default Does anyone know what computer this CPU was used in?

    I acquired a lone solitary 80286-XC CPU a while back and I have no idea if it works or what computer it might have been used in. Does anyone know what it might have been used in, where I can find information about it, how fast it is, or what motherboards it might be compatible with? Is it possible that it is compatible with an IBM 5170 motherboard?
    s-l1600-1.jpgs-l1600-2.jpg

    This is all I've been able to find: http://www.x86-guide.com/en/cpu/IBM-...pu-no1079.html
    Last edited by Exceter; July 20th, 2019 at 09:40 PM.
    Once upon a time, the internet sucked because it came through the phone. Now the phones suck because they come through the internet.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,825
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    Used on the 5170 512K motherboard 6480148-XM. Here's one

    Probably fairly late in the 5170 production; CPU is almost certainly an 8Mhz model.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Used on the 5170 512K motherboard 6480148-XM. Here's one

    Probably fairly late in the 5170 production; CPU is almost certainly an 8Mhz model.
    Awesome! Thank you! Do you happen to know if it is backwards compatible with older 5170 boards? For example, could you use it to upgrade a 5170 which has a 6mhz CPU?
    Once upon a time, the internet sucked because it came through the phone. Now the phones suck because they come through the internet.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,825
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    If you changed the crystal, sure (and assuming that you didn't have the IBM BIOS that prevented it). But why? The die is almost certainly just a licensed copy by IBM of the Intel original, given the date.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    If you changed the crystal, sure (and assuming that you didn't have the IBM BIOS that prevented it). But why? The die is almost certainly just a licensed copy by IBM of the Intel original, given the date.
    Well, if I could get a few more Mhz by dropping in a different chip it might be worth doing just to get a little more speed. But if I'd also have to solder in a new crystal... That's not worth it(at least not to me).
    Once upon a time, the internet sucked because it came through the phone. Now the phones suck because they come through the internet.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,825
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    Well, if you dig into some of the publications of that time (e.g. PC Week), kits were being offered to kick the speed of the 5170 up. They were mostly assortments of crystals--just pick the fastest one with which your system was stable. There were a couple of more elegant PLL kits; just turn the knob to vary your CPU speed. The BIOS check on the CPU speed was added later. In fact, although sold as 6MHz machines, most later 5170s shipped with 8MHz-rated CPUs, but most 6MHz 80286 CPUs could do 8Mhz without breaking a sweat.

    I suppose that this was the first widespread instance of OC-ing. But this made sense--before the 80386, the 8MHz 80286 was pretty much the end of the line for speed in name-brand PCs, so OC-ing was very attractive.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •