Image Map Image Map
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Could anyone help with the 8086 based system?

  1. #1

    Default Could anyone help with the 8086 based system?

    I have a project. It still misses data for the 8086 based systems. These systems were much rarer than the 8088/80286 based systems. I know that European computer manufacturers Amstrad and Olivetti produced the 8086 based PC and the latter were quite popular in the US. BTW it may be interesting that the SU produced almost all its IBM PC compatible clones with the 8086 analogue. There were even a special co-pro chip for it which added partial functionality of the 80286 to the 8086.
    This thread can be attached to this one.
    pi-ibmpc.zip

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    28

    Default

    I don't think I have specifically an 8086 system, but I do have a Zenith system (EaZy PC) which has an NEC V30; basically the 8086 version of the popular NEC V20, used to replace 8088s. I could run the test when I get home next weekend.
    Current favorites: IBM 5160 (EGA+Hercules, 4 floppies, ST-225, XT-IDE), Compaq Portable ii (replaced PSU and keyboard, EMS card), ASR 33 Teletype (needs work, bit stuck high on tape reader, local mode broken)
    Wishlist: Toshiba Libretto docking station, IBM 5161 (expansion chassis), IBM Professional Graphics Controller (PGC), IBM 3270 PC keyboard card, Tandy disk-video interface (for Model 100-series), STAR acoustic modem, DG Nova IO controllers, dual-sided 8 inch floppy drive, and the meaning of life.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,763
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    There were even a special co-pro chip for it which added partial functionality of the 80286 to the 8086.
    I'm very interested in this. I'm aware that an 8086 could be replaced by a NEC V30 (70116) CPU for the same end, but I've never heard of a copro chip to provide extended 286 instruction support.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Cleveland, OH, USA
    Posts
    888

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I'm very interested in this. I'm aware that an 8086 could be replaced by a NEC V30 (70116) CPU for the same end, but I've never heard of a copro chip to provide extended 286 instruction support.
    The Olivetti / AT&T PC 6300's 8086-based mobo had provision for an 8087 coprocessor. The 8087 added math capabilities similar to those that were on the die of the 80286 and higher version CPUs. Perhaps it is this to which the OP refers?

    -CH-

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nevets01 View Post
    I don't think I have specifically an 8086 system, but I do have a Zenith system (EaZy PC) which has an NEC V30; basically the 8086 version of the popular NEC V20, used to replace 8088s. I could run the test when I get home next weekend.
    Indeed, it will be interesting to get data for the V30 and V20. I just forgot about them. Thank you in advance. I am also curious, was it possible to buy a NEC chips based IBM PC in the USA in the 80's?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I'm very interested in this. I'm aware that an 8086 could be replaced by a NEC V30 (70116) CPU for the same end, but I've never heard of a copro chip to provide extended 286 instruction support.
    I am about a Russian IBM PC compatible model ES-1842 (produced since 1988, there were produced slightly more than 10000 units). It uses a clone of 8086@8Mhz and a special co-pro chip КА1843ВГ1 which is a separate MMU. Some of the 80286 instructions were emulated. It is written that it could run protected mode software for the 80286. IMHO its performance may be about 50% of the first PC AT. You can try some translation software if you want to get more details, for example, from this page
    EDIT. BTW this ES-1842 was the best SU's PC compatible computer with every detail made in the SU.
    Last edited by vol.litwr; July 21st, 2019 at 11:29 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    5,942
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Here are 8 MHz 8086 results (AT&T 6300, an Olivetti M24 clone):

    100: 0.38
    1000: 25.04
    3000: 216.58

    It is difficult for me to put an NEC V30 in a system right now, so I'll wait for someone else to provide those numbers. If they can't, ping me in a few weeks.

    The next closest result in your list at more than triple the speed is the 6 MHz 80286 IBM AT. It's that much faster because your benchmark is essentially a benchmark of how fast MUL and DIV work, and MUL/DIV were sped up nearly 4x going from the 8086 to the 80286.
    Offering a bounty for:
    - The software "Overhead Express" (doesn't have to be original, can be a copy)
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775, Olivetti M24, or Logabax 1600
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nevets01 View Post
    I don't think I have specifically an 8086 system, but I do have a Zenith system (EaZy PC) which has an NEC V30; basically the 8086 version of the popular NEC V20, used to replace 8088s. I could run the test when I get home next weekend.
    Actually the EaZy PC uses the NEC V40, which is a V20 with integrated peripherals. It has an 8-bit external data bus like the 8088.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Shrewsbury, MA
    Posts
    894

    Default

    I've got a Panasonic Exec Partner, Amstrad PC1512, and a PS/2 Model 25 all with 8086's I can test.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,763
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vol.litwr View Post
    II am about a Russian IBM PC compatible model ES-1842 (produced since 1988, there were produced slightly more than 10000 units). It uses a clone of 8086@8Mhz and a special co-pro chip КА1843ВГ1 which is a separate MMU. Some of the 80286 instructions were emulated. It is written that it could run protected mode software for the 80286. IMHO its performance may be about 50% of the first PC AT. You can try some translation software if you want to get more details, for example, from this page
    EDIT. BTW this ES-1842 was the best SU's PC compatible computer with every detail made in the SU.
    There is some discussion here, but there is also a fair bit of skepticism even among the Russian posters. I wish I could find a datasheet for the processor.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    5,942
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RadRacer203 View Post
    I've got a Panasonic Exec Partner, Amstrad PC1512, and a PS/2 Model 25 all with 8086's I can test.
    The Amstrad and PS/2 Model 25 are also 8MHz 8086s. If you can put an NEC V30 into one of those and test, that would satisfy the OP's request.
    Offering a bounty for:
    - The software "Overhead Express" (doesn't have to be original, can be a copy)
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775, Olivetti M24, or Logabax 1600
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •