Image Map Image Map
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Data General Nova 1200

  1. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nevets01 View Post
    Nice! Was this from that typesetting business? I got a Nova clone and a TTY from that guy. Unfortunately, mine didn't come with the IO board, so I'll have to find one... somewhere.
    Nevets01, this is all very exciting to me. So, what caused you to ask if it was from a typesetting business, and might have come from a phototypesetter?

    I've only recently come to learn about DG Novas in these things...There's a nice DG Nova in this Singer Photomix 8400, which is now part of my collection:
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Htb...ew?usp=sharing

    Notice no front face control panel in this one. Was yours (or Commodore Z's) extracted from such a machine? And if so, how did it come with such a beautiful front face?

    And I'm curious, has anyone else preserved one or more of these [gargantuan and VERY heavy!!!] phototypesetter machines in their entirety, as opposed stripping out the DG Nova and scrapping the rest?
    Last edited by firebirdta84; November 14th, 2020 at 10:48 PM. Reason: add specificity

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Qbus View Post
    ...The Holy Grail for me is getting the paper tape version of Nova Basic, been working on that for over five years now but not much progress. Was told that when you bought a Nova the paper tape version of Basic came with it.
    Qbus
    Qbus, I assume that you're looking for a vintage 50-year-old tape with Nova Basic on it. But in the meantime, what would you think about Nova Basic being punched new/today on a paper tape for you?

    I don't think that I have the capability to do this yet, but if it would be meaningful to you, I'll keep it in mind with my Nova restoration and build project list for the next year or so...

    Best,
    AJ

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Salisbury Maryland
    Posts
    848

    Default

    That would be great, in the playroom I have facilities for reading, punching or copying paper tape. So just about any source will work within reason. Also have facilities for reading, writing and editing ROMS so I am just about state of the art for 1970
    Paper tape has a unique advantage being it can with care last forever, floppy drives are fairly durable but beyond a point the drives themselves are getting harder to find. A lot of the old first generation MFM and IDE hard drives are still around and work but that’s just the ones that were for some reason put aside and never left on for years on end and somehow the old disk packs in things like the RL and RK drives chug on, can’t say as much for a lot of the modern stuff.
    But paper tape is so simple, no media to decompose or magnetic elements to weaken or special heads to read can see that lasting forever. The only limitation is it’s not practical for large files.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by firebirdta84 View Post
    Nevets01, this is all very exciting to me. So, what caused you to ask if it was from a typesetting business, and might have come from a phototypesetter?

    I've only recently come to learn about DG Novas in these things...There's a nice DG Nova in this Singer Photomix 8400, which is now part of my collection:
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Htb...ew?usp=sharing

    Notice no front face control panel in this one. Was yours (or Commodore Z's) extracted from such a machine? And if so, how did it come with such a beautiful front face?

    And I'm curious, has anyone else preserved one or more of these [gargantuan and VERY heavy!!!] phototypesetter machines in their entirety, as opposed stripping out the DG Nova and scrapping the rest?
    So I follow up on a lead from this very forum about a typesetter's warehouse that had closed down, and the owner was trying to sell some of the contents.
    When I got there, there were two DG Novae, and a Digital Computer Controls D-116. I ended up with the D-116, since he wanted a great deal more than I could afford for the 'genuine' Novae, as well as an ASR-33 teletype and some other odds and ends.
    As it turns out, just a couple days after I left, Glitch came and bought the entire contents of the warehouse (and believe me, it was a LOT) for a large sum of money. And Z bought his Nova off of him. The fact that he posted about a fairly obscure computer shortly after three of them had sold led me to (correctly) suspect that they had come from the same source.
    All three machines were freestanding, not in a rack or any other enclosure, when I got there. If they had been extracted, I have no way of knowing for sure or for certain.
    Now on to speculation.
    If you look closely at the I/O board that Z got with his Nova, you may notice a rather snazzy logo for a company called "CompuScan". A large nameplate from the same company is present on my Teletype. A couple hours of googling led me to the conclusion that CompuScan was a company what developed early OCR systems.
    Speculation: Z's Nova (and my Teletype, attached to it) was attached to some form of early OCR scanner at some point in its life.
    I can't say whether it was still there or not, I only had a few hours to look around, and I was considerably less savvy at that point. You would probably want to ask Glitch. If anyone has/had it, it would likely be him.
    Current favorites: IBM 5160 (EGA+Hercules+PGC, 8 floppy drives, XT-IDE), DCC D-116 (Nova 1200 clone), ASR 33 Teletype (now FULLY armed and operational! Mostly.)
    Wishlist: IBM 5161 (expansion chassis), Diablo 31/RK02/RK05 or equivalent, Data General equipment, and the meaning of life.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Salisbury Maryland
    Posts
    848

    Default

    So far, all my work with Rolm Military system lets me assume that they are basically repackaged Data General NOVA systems. The instruction set is the same, devices like paper tape readers and terminals are all the same addresses and instruction set and so on. The issue is now on the latest Rolm system that I just picked up has a Real Time Clock card, anyone have any idea what the address was that they used for the RTC option? Or how it was set? It has no battery so going to assume that once you turned on the system you loaded a current date and time and went on from there. Would also be a question if it keeps the date along with the time if its Y2K compliant? Not that it matters being I just want to use the clock function.

  6. #16

    Default

    The so-called Real Time Clock on the Nova was not what we think of today as an RTC. It simply provides periodic interrupts, at 10, 100, 1000 Hz or power line frequency. The keeping of time & date has to be done in software. RTC is device number 14 (octal). You'll find a description of it operation in this document: http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/dg/DG_N...rs_Apr1971.pdf

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •