Image Map Image Map
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: My (not so beautifull soldered) 5volt VIC-II in 12volt board adaptors.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Denmark, Northern Jutland.
    Posts
    39

    Default My (not so beautifull soldered) 5volt VIC-II in 12volt board adaptors.

    I just wanted to share a little nifty thing, that I soldered today. I am not a pro at soldering, so bare with me on that. Yet they have no shortening between legs, and they are as low profile as I can do them at this point. I did two adaptor's today.

    What are they good for? Well... The main reason is that I avoid modding a 12volt board, and I can get the image quality that a 5volt chip provides. The jailbars can then be eliminated by the use of a Lumafix. (Or something like that)

    First I rasped off pin-13 of the bottom socket, then soldered a wire between pin-13 and pin-40 on the top socket, feeding pin-13 some 5volt. Finally sandwiched them together. Again... Sorry for my bad soldering. I am far from a pro at this stuff.

    Adaptor-01-Bottom-Part.jpg Adaptor-02-Top-Part.jpg Adaptor-03-Finished-Sandwich.jpg Adaptor-04-Side-01.jpg Adaptor-05-Side-02.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,810
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    I confess that I'm a little confused--why the "stacked" sockets? Wouldn't it be simpler to simply cut off the +12 pin and use a bit of 30 AWG wire to jumper it to the +5 and then put a drop or two of epoxy over the rasped-off section? At least that way, you'd only be adding a single socket.

    My .02 anyay

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Denmark, Northern Jutland.
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I confess that I'm a little confused--why the "stacked" sockets? Wouldn't it be simpler to simply cut off the +12 pin and use a bit of 30 AWG wire to jumper it to the +5 and then put a drop or two of epoxy over the rasped-off section? At least that way, you'd only be adding a single socket.

    My .02 anyay
    That is for refinement. At least this way, I will not have to cut into a VIC-II chip and I will not have to mod the board it self. Finally. My soldering skill's are not that good, and I had no epoxy in the house. I did take notice, that once I had rasped off the pin, the hole are not as long as a pin on a VIC-II chip. So by doing what you sugest, then I would not be able to push the VIC-II all the way down into the socket. I think this might lead to a chip, that are prone to jump out of the socket. Another thing that I had thoughts on.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,810
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    Well, if it's long pins that you want, consider a plain old wirewrap socket:



    Clip the pins to any length that you want. Extra benefit in that the pins are square, not round.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Denmark, Northern Jutland.
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Well, if it's long pins that you want, consider a plain old wirewrap socket:



    Clip the pins to any length that you want. Extra benefit in that the pins are square, not round.
    Would that not result in the same hight?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,810
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    If your problem is that the round machine-pin sockets are too short to ensure that the chip stays in, the WW socket will certainly cure that for you.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Denmark, Northern Jutland.
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    If your problem is that the round machine-pin sockets are too short to ensure that the chip stays in, the WW socket will certainly cure that for you.
    True that. Yet that is only an issue, if you insert and remove things a lot.

  8. #8

    Default

    The wire wrap pins tend to damage the sockets. I've used the regular machine pin solder sockets, even on pinball machines and not had one fall off. If one is really worried, a small dab of silicon glue will keep it from falling off and easily removed when one wants to remove one.
    Dwight

  9. #9

    Default

    I should note that if you want a pin to be disconnected, the machine pins are easy to remove. You place the socket upside down on a block of wood with a hole, slightly larger than the pins largest diameter. I usually use a pair of short nosed pliers and push from the solder pin side. The machine pin post pops right out.
    With the socket pin completely out, it is not going to short to anything.
    Dwight

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    31,810
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    The wire wrap pins tend to damage the sockets. I've used the regular machine pin solder sockets, even on pinball machines and not had one fall off. If one is really worried, a small dab of silicon glue will keep it from falling off and easily removed when one wants to remove one.
    Dwight
    I'll confess to having taken ww sockets and ground the pins down a bit to get them to fit into another machine-pin socket.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •