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Thread: Selling NEC PC-9801VM

  1. #11
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    "A bunch of phoney-fake-fraudulent-pseudo-phoney-cheapish_knock_off IBM incompatibles'

    I'm not aware if any of the aforementioned were marketed as competition for the IBM PC. The QX-10, for example, was marketed on the basis of its simplicity of operation (Valdocs). Without Valdocs, I suspect the QX-10 would have been a flop.

  2. #12
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    Whether or not they were intended as outright competition, I would have to say they were intending to grab a portion of the sales based on an 8088 or comparable chip. And the vast majority had MS-DOS ported. When the smoke cleared and Phoenix arrived on the seen, most of those companies began making real compatibles. Early on the incompatibilities were due to making the h/w superior (and avoiding lawsuits) or outright designing the h/d and s/w to avoid lawsuits. When they got too close to the fireplace, things got hot.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Name some.

    I mention the Multi-16 since it was very early (1981) and relatively unknown outside of Japan. I mention it also because it was Mitsubishi and I've run into Mitsu PLC software that proudly says that you can run some of the design programs on your Multi-16. Cool--where do I find one? Generally, the later Mitsubishi PLC software was based on MS-DOS for the PC98 platform (e.g. the floppies were 8x1024 per track and 1.23MB per on 77 tracks).
    Aside from the Multi-16, there were a whole class of 80x86 machines that didn't make.it beyond Japan much if at all. Ok the PC JX may fall on that list, but that was considerably later. Many had dual processors, 6809, 68000. Not sure which percentage had DOS ports. But they were all as cool as all get out. We only simply see glimpses of their delectable weirdness in boxes like the Canon AS-100 and Fujitsu Micro 16s.

  4. #14
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    You miss my point. The APC was an 8086-equipped machine that could run CP/M-86 or MSDOS, just not the IBM PC variety, natively.

    The SLE is a card to gain a certain amount of PC compatibility. It's basically the same as the native APC CPU (86 and 88 differ only in BIU). I'm not aware of many x86 systems that used a separate processor card to achieve PC compatibility.

  5. #15
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    If my multiple postings seemed to indicate I'm a scatter brain you'd be totally correct in that assertion. But I did name a few. There weren't an endless variety. But I for one lack complete knowledge of those years so I'm guessing there were others besides the ones I mentioned. And they are not easy to find. I only know of 1 person that had 1 for the tipc, and he doesn't commonly post here, but has in the last 6 months. He actually pointed out that there was more then 1 for the TIPC in particular. Strangely the Tandy 2000, possibly the best known pseudo compatible, didn't have 1. One guy was working on a hack that I was in touch with. A hack indeed. It was reminiscent (in an anachronistic sort of way) of the methods Bunnie Huang employed in "Hacking the Xbox". I.e via silicon sniffing.

  6. #16
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    The original APC appears to be an export version of the N5200, AFAIK

  7. #17
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    Meawhile, how much is being offered for the 9801VM?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cuba200611 View Post
    The original APC appears to be an export version of the N5200, AFAIK
    Yup--aimed mostly at the business community, not the home computer. Its build quality pretty much attests to that.

    Oddly, it was cheaper than a similarly equipped IBM 5150. I almost bought one, but then thought better of it. I figured that the world would follow IBM--and it did.

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