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Thread: Why were 720k discs blue?

  1. #1

    Default Why were 720k discs blue?

    Why were they, when both 8 and 5.25 were pitch black?, while I take advantage of the colour coding to make a distinction between my 720k and black 1.44M, it feels like an anachronism? Surely the original 720k should be black like its predecessors, while the improved HD disk would be getting a different colour. But it's the other way around.

    Not all of them are, but it is my experience that most are when I look to buy old stock of 720k.

  2. #2
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    Shrug. Sony used blue as their standard stock color for DS2D; heaven knows why. But I've got them in green, yellow, red and orange, as well as black, beige and white. I don't recall seeing any in clear transparent jackets, but I don't doubt that someone has one--just not much to see.

    Why were DSHD 3.5" disks almost universally beige initially, then switched to black?

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    Beige seems to be the preference for IBM DSHDs. And later DSHDs came in various colours including clear. My DrDos 6 720k disks were black as were my PCGeos 720k disks. Some of my 720k disks are also beige. NT 3.51 1.44meg setup disks are beige. There doesn't really seem to be any rhyme or reason as far as colouring.
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    The colors were not any kind of code. 5.25" and 3.5" disks came in all kinds of colors.

    Sony's blue might have come about, in part, to call attention to the rigid nature of the case. I seem to vaguely recall they also made some other blue computer products. In all probability, beige 3.5" disks were pushed by Apple to match the early Macintosh computers. For a time the clean, pure, bright white/beige was quite popular and everyone copied Apple. Then around 2000 eveyone started making everything ugly black. (Oh booo hoo dirt is more visible on white cases, so clean it already!) That seemed to be about when 3.5" floppies started commonly coming in black.

  5. #5

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    The majority of mine had white cases. Back when I worked in the depot service department at ZDS, there was a bin full of floppies over in the teardown area. These were disks that either returned with evaluation systems, or they were from excess stock that was being torn down to be used as part of the replacement parts pool. We'd grab a bunch of disk, re-format them, and use them to run diags on laptops. On occasion some disks would find their selves being used for personal use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Shrug. Sony used blue as their standard stock color for DS2D; heaven knows why. But I've got them in green, yellow, red and orange, as well as black, beige and white. I don't recall seeing any in clear transparent jackets, but I don't doubt that someone has one--just not much to see.

    Why were DSHD 3.5" disks almost universally beige initially, then switched to black?
    I have some in translucent red cases, so you can see the disk...
    Dave
    G4UGM

    Looking for Analog Computers, Drum Plotters, and Graphics Terminals

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