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Thread: WTB: FTP-capable PC with 5.25" floppy drive in San Francisco Bay Area

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    14

    Default WTB: FTP-capable PC with 5.25" floppy drive in San Francisco Bay Area

    Hi everyone!

    I'm on a quest to get my 'new' Compaq Portable 386 working, but to do so requires some special BIOS configuration disks + DOS boot floppies. I may just have some made for me, but long-term it would be cool to have a "bridge machine" which is both new enough to connect to my home LAN with Ethernet, but old enough to support writing to 5.25" floppies. If you're anywhere near San Francisco CA and have a machine which might suit this purpose, let me know and maybe we can work something out!



    Huxley

    PS If by some miracle I get multiple offers on this, I'll have a preference for the smallest machine that fits my needs - I'm in a pretty cramped apartment and generally prefer smaller devices where possible

  2. #2

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    any machine with a NIC is "FTP-capable"

    I run mbrutman's mTCP suite with its FTP server and client on my IBM 5150 running a WD8003E ISA network card with an external AUI to RJ-45 transceiver

  3. #3

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    Every one of us should have a 'tweener'.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maxtherabbit View Post
    any machine with a NIC is "FTP-capable"
    This is totally true, and is also pretty good evidence that I shouldn't be posting on hobby-forums while also being totally distracted during all-day work conferences

    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Every one of us should have a 'tweener'.
    Agreed! I tend to be more of an Apple guy, and I have a couple machines I use for this stuff - primarily a Wallstreet PowerBook and a PowerBook 1400 - both are really great bridges between modern era stuff and early-generation machines. Definitely looking forward to having a PC that can serve the same role!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dublin, CA USA
    Posts
    2,765
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    Default

    For a tweener I would recommend something in the Pentium 2 or 3 era, running Windows 98SE or possibly XP if it's new enough. This allows you enough modern software options and network connectivity as well as hardware that can support the needed floppy drives. Then, for floppy drives, install 2 5.25" floppy drives, one 360K and one 1.2Mb as well as a USB 3.5" drive. This setup, with Winimage, would allow you to archive disks to a network repository, make any disk you need in any of the 4 formats PCs generally use (360k 720k 1.2Mb or 1.44Mb). The pentium 2/3 simply allows you to do this with some speed (Win98SE runs really smoothly and responsively on these CPUs).

    My tweener is an AMD k6/2 system, and it works very well for making and archiving disks, as well as moving data over my network.

    IBM 5160 - 360k, 1.44Mb Floppies, NEC V20, 8087-3, 45MB MFM Hard Drive, Vega 7 Graphics, IBM 5154 Monitor running MS-DOS 5.00
    IBM PCJr Model 48360 640kb RAM, NEC V20,, jrIDE Side Cart, 360kb Floppy drives running MS-DOS 5.00
    Evergreen Am5x86-133 64Mb Ram, 8gb HDD, SB16 in a modified ATX case running IBM PC-DOS 7.10

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    1,367

    Default

    FWIW, congratulations on the purchase, I hope the machine is working fine. Purely coincidentally I randomly happened to see the Craigslist ad I'm guessing you bought it from yesterday, and it was almost certainly the pick of the litter. I really don't need one but I can't help wishing that someday a plasma portable would fall in my lap.

    Personally I'd be really tempted to see if I could install a Gotek with FlashFloppy in the machine but I guess that might be substantially more awkward a task than the usual between the weird 1/3rd height drive bays and the fact that it's a portable.

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