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Thread: 20 year old software on 23 year old hardwarw.

  1. #1
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    Default 20 year old software on 23 year old hardwarw.

    Going through testing some old hard drives to see if they are stil still fubctioning fine. Came across a 4gig BigFoot drive with Turbo Linux 6.0 on it. Hooked it up to my Pentium 166MMX based rig. Connected a nic and thought I'd test how well Netscape Comunictor 4.75 ran and if I can post here and over at vogons.org. Very plesently surprised.
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    Last edited by Caluser2000; August 29th, 2019 at 11:47 AM.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  2. #2
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    I keep a few old retail boxed Linux distros around to play with and can never get into them for some reason.

    5.25" Bigfoots are pretty rare in working order these days, have one in a Compaq that is OEM and worked last time I checked it.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

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    Quantum Bigfoots were an interesting curiosity, but not well liked outside of the OEM market.

    They were big, slow and loud, but had an advantage in cost due to the larger platters not requiring as high of a data density for a given size. The slow 3600 RPM and later 4000 RPM spindle speed meant slow access times and low throughput.

    I used a few of them in the late 90s and early 2000s and they were generally pretty reliable compared to Quantum's other IDE drive offerings which were known to have high failure rates.

  4. #4
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    I've still got a few of them, mostly the 6, 8 and 12 GB ones. Probably very reliable in the long run, but I never used one for long enough to make that determination. 12GB was quite a bit of storage back then and Quantum was dumping the drives at bargain prices.

  5. #5
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    The bigfoot is working perfectly with less noice than the psu so all is good. I've a few in various systems including a 386 and XT Turbo. Used NS to download Opera 9.27. Tried 9.20 but that was far too buggy. I though up dating software on old linux distros was was hard.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  6. #6
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    Debian 8 installed fine on this system. Installed Xorg, a few DMs and WMs ran as fine as the old stuff did around the '2000s on a similar specced system. Epipany browser plays nicely as well. FireFox bombed right off the bat and Aroura was a mess. Well done Gnome devs.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  7. #7
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    I can't imagine running modern Firefox on a Pentium 166mhz, it's painful on the 1.4ghz Pentium M laptop I've been using lately for... retro-computing things. It's remarkable just how terrible mainstream web browsers are because other than that the machine is fine, almost sprightly.

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    Yip I think some some browser load too much unneeded garbage as well in the name of so called security. I didn't really expect FireFox to run fast at all but to not load goes to show how crappy it is has gotten. You can't even fart now without having a security certificate.

    I'm doing this just as a matter of curiosity. It's been a interesting exercise really over the last 6 months or so to see what old distro browser combo still works on vcfed and vogons. Netscape 4.72 Xorg dropped SiS legacy chip set video cards around 2011. S3Virge/DX cards are still going strong. on Turbo Linux have been my oldest so far. I think I have a Slackware 3.5 cd around here somewhere.
    Last edited by Caluser2000; October 2nd, 2019 at 09:09 PM.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  9. #9
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    Firefox is so massively bloated now that even modern systems have trouble running it. I abandoned it back when they decided to kill modding support in FF 57 (which is why the vast majority of users used it), but it was getting unbearable then with the massive problems with memory leaks eating up all of the system RAM. You could seriously leave one tab open on any website overnight and come back the next day to find it consuming 2, 3, 4 and sometimes 5 GB of memory. Mozilla recently decided to kill mods on older versions of FF because of "security issues", so if you had an old version of FF, E.T. Phone Home to Mozilla servers would make FF disable all addons and you can't re-enable them even with hacking in the aboutreferences settings.

    It's also still the only browser that uses a monolithic design. Chrome spins off threads for everything, but FF has three main threads for everything. The FF executable is the primary thread, the website tabs are another and the plugins are the last. This means that one misbehaving website can and will lock up all other tabs in the browser, the same goes with misbehaving plugins.

  10. #10
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    It use to be my go to browser untill thy did that big change some time back. Palemoon is my default now though that may change.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

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