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Thread: An unknown Leading Edge laptop & a wonky Toshiba

  1. #1

    Default An unknown Leading Edge laptop & a wonky Toshiba

    I was wondering if there was any information on this Leading Edge laptop that I just got from the recycling center. This is a LEP-9123SX/16. A google search come up completely dry, and nothing on eBay. Almost like this computer doesn't exist. Also, the battery is connected to the DC in. I found the power adapter, but as a result I am not sure if the thing boots up at all since the battery is corroded. Literally the only thing that appears on a search is the battery itself. Does anybody have ANY information on this thing??

    Also, in the same haul a Toshiba Satellite T1950CT that attempts to boot up, but fails after roughly 5 seconds. I can't figure out if it is the BIOS, motherboard, CMOS, corrosion or RAM.

    I have to disassemble both of them to take a further look, but any help would be appreciated.

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  2. #2

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    Looks like a Sager laptop that was sold under dozens of brand names -- there's probably nothing Leading Edge about it except the logo that was put on the case.

  3. #3

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    Come to think of it that is probably true, but that leads to again nothing. Infact, even less than the Leading Edge. I have never seen something like this before. Thanks for the idea though, I'll keep an eye out for Sager's too.

  4. #4
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    Toshiba T1950CT maintenance manual at [here].

  5. #5

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    Looking up the FCC ID on fccid.io, I was able to find out that the Leading Edge was manufactued by Daewoo Electronics. Dates from around 1991 and runs a 386SX at 16 MHz.

    https://fccid.io/C5F7NFCPC911S

    Found an article in InfoWorld. Looks like it was one of Leading Edge's first notebooks, introduced in May 1991.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=YlAEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA30

    I had a very similar Toshiba, a T1950, that also would shut off after a split second. I think the issue is with the capacitors on the power supply board.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by bitshox View Post
    Looking up the FCC ID on fccid.io, I was able to find out that the Leading Edge was manufactued by Daewoo Electronics. Dates from around 1991 and runs a 386SX at 16 MHz.

    https://fccid.io/C5F7NFCPC911S

    Found an article in InfoWorld. Looks like it was one of Leading Edge's first notebooks, introduced in May 1991.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=YlAEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA30

    I had a very similar Toshiba, a T1950, that also would shut off after a split second. I think the issue is with the capacitors on the power supply board.
    Huh, never had thought to take a look at the FCC ID on the thing. Thanks so much for the help! You so far have been the only one to find any information on the thing. This is a big help, but it still does not have us find the exact model yet and what it had. I have been so backed up recently that I have not had the chance to even take it apart.

    As for the Toshiba, once again thanks for the help, and it was the capacitor in the DC-in board. That will need to get replaced with a suitable replacement and I would be happy to post a guide once I get that complete.

  7. #7

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    Yeah I've found that FCC ID look-ups cut straight through the manufacturer sticker and identifies the OEM most of the time. In this case, Leading Edge were already the exclusive distributor of Daewoo computers as of several years prior, when Daewoo manufactured their Model D PC clone. Daewoo even bought out Leading Edge when the latter went bankrupt.

    Reading the InfoWorld article, yours has a 20MB hard drive, a 1.44MB 3.5" floppy drive, a 9-inch monochrome passive-matrix display, a VGA video chip and at least 1 MB of RAM. The break-away battery/power supply combo looks cool, although I can see that as a major failure point if the batteries start to leak. It doesn't seem like there's a way to disassemble that part unless there's some hidden snaps.

    I regret chucking that Toshiba. I abandoned it too easily when the plastic of the top-half of the case around the keyboard started to crack when I separated it from the bottom-half. I figured it was worth more for parts so I threw away the chassis and kept the boards. What a waste. At least it didn't cost me that much.

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