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Thread: DRM Not

  1. #1
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    Default DRM Not

    Something's afoot in the gaming industry. Today I was browsing through the new releases on Gog and came upon 'Fantasy General II', DRM free. This is a fairly new game and goes for what most games of this ilk do. I did a quick search just to see what the Steam version of the same game was going for on the open market, and to my surprise, it was exactly the same price as Gog. This leaves me wondering if the publishers are starting to feel a little uncomfortable with the Steam thing. As a matter of fact, there are quite a few fairly new releases on Gog, so this doesn't seem to be an isolated incident. Question: Which one are you going to go for if this is your play pretty?
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  2. #2
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    I'm okay with Steam's DRM as long as they still honor their exit strategy to unlock all purchased games permanently prior to shutting down.
    Remember that some of the alternatives right now are far less forgiving, or even remove purchased games from your library at the end of the distribution license.

    Or you are Epic, where the service is unreliable, flag happy and [I can't talk about this] because Tim is paying the developers in order to secure exclusivity.
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  3. #3
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    I would think that even at the same retail price publishers make more per sale on GOG then Stream.

    If I am going to buy a digital game I would rather have no DRM. The only STEAM games I have are ones you can't get any other way.
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  4. #4
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    Steam hasn't changed their pricing structure for publishing commercial games since they started being a 3rd party publisher. I've read from various sources that it's anywhere from 30/70 to 50/50 depending on the game/company.

    It's why game companies (especially indie studios) are jumping ship from the Steam platform to the Epic store or are publishing to multiple platforms to increase their revenue. The fees are a lot lower and they get to keep more of their profit.

  5. #5
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    Computer games are like movies, there are huge hundred million dollar hits and small ones nobody sees and don't make money with nothing in between. Indie titles are using places other then steam because steam is full of thousands of crap cheap games that are competing with each other.
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  6. #6

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    Half Life 2 was the first and last steam game I've ever owned

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Indie titles are using places other then steam because steam is full of thousands of crap cheap games that are competing with each other.
    Steam has become a dumpster fire in terms of cheap games. For a long time they had problems with shitty game "developers" which were downloading tech demos from popular engines and doing asset flips on them to try and make a quick buck. One of the worst was probably the guy that sued Jim Sterling that owned "Digital Homicide". In a couple of cases the guy released like 14 variations of the same game with different skins, calling them sequels.

    It's really hard for indie developers on steam because of that. Valve introduced something called "Green Light" to get the community to pick good games out of the trash, but it quickly became heavily abused. Some indie developers were offering to pay off gamers with vouchers or other rewards to vote for their game regardless of testing it or not.

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