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Thread: Anybody watch 4k movies on an amd fx chip?

  1. #1

    Default Anybody watch 4k movies on an amd fx chip?

    Is it fast enough with a decent graphics card? What about energy efficient chips like the FX-8300? I can't afford 4k luxuries so I thought I'd ask.
    Last edited by computerdude92; September 19th, 2019 at 09:04 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by computerdude92 View Post
    Is it fast enough with a decent graphics card? What about energy efficient chips like the FX-8300? I can't afford 4k luxuries so I thought I'd ask.
    Speaking for myself, if I'm going to watch a 4K movie, presumably on a Blu-ray CD, I going to sit in front of a large screen TV and load it into my Blu-ray player. But, each to their own. I had a 8350 a while back and it was a 'just adequate' gamer and the main reason that I built a Asus Z170 with an I7-6700. So, do you have a 4K monitor?
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    Ever use Chromecast?

    Got any opinions, observations or suggestions?
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

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    It depends on what graphics card you have, since the AMD FX series of chips don't (IIRC) have the quicksync extensions that Intel built for H.264 and H.264 encoding/decoding. Any video card made in the last 3 years should have an encoding/decoding block on it, which players like VLC use (again, IIRC).

    It also depends on the software -- not all players support all acceleration methods.
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    You can watch 1080p using .x265 (much heavier encryption then h.264) using a 10 year old ATI video card (HD4650 I think it is) and a 2.8ghz quad core Opteron without losing frames. Video cards have had 264 decoding built into them for a while, x265 decoding is fairly new and that is what 4k video uses I think.
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    In that configuration, your Opteron is doing 100% of the decoding. The OP is going to need either a recent Intel-based rig with embedded GPU (those models are the ones that include quicksync extensions), or a modern AMD/nvidia GPU with an h.265 decoding block.

    Very few modern desktop PCs can decode 4k h.265 @ 24fps using only generic CPU decoding. 16-core Xeon workstation, maybe? Proper (HDR or DolbyVision) 4K content is 12 bits per component, so that's nearly a gigabyte of data per second to decompress with a very complicated algorithm.

    Quote Originally Posted by computerdude92 View Post
    I can't afford 4k luxuries so I thought I'd ask.
    Having experienced 4k from a 42" 8-bit $500 monitor to a 65" 12-bit $2500 OLED, I can quite firmly state: Wait until you can afford the 65" OLED. 4k is more than resolution, and a proper HDR- or DolbyVision-capable display with perfect blacks is worth the wait. I got mine at Costco, which is what I'd recommend in case you need to exchange it because the first (or second, or third) OLED you purchase has a panel uniformity/quality issue. You can go cheap on the model, and get a smaller size to further get the cost down, but it really needs to be an OLED.
    Last edited by Trixter; September 20th, 2019 at 09:58 AM.
    Offering a bounty for:
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    - A working Sanyo MBC-775, Olivetti M24, or Logabax 1600
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Ever use Chromecast?

    Got any opinions, observations or suggestions?
    Yes, I've had it for a long time. I used to use it to stream movie CD's from my laptop but now all of that comes from my Plex server. I still use it to browse the IE when I'm looking for something. I have one of the older units and you have to jump though a few hoops when you move it around from tv to tv. Also, my unit requires that you setup it up with Google Home from your cell and you need to do a hard reset on each move. All in all, it works pretty good. When traveling I used to stream Netflix with it. Go for it.
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trixter View Post
    It depends on what graphics card you have, since the AMD FX series of chips don't (IIRC) have the quicksync extensions that Intel built for H.264 and H.264 encoding/decoding. Any video card made in the last 3 years should have an encoding/decoding block on it, which players like VLC use (again, IIRC).

    It also depends on the software -- not all players support all acceleration methods.
    So you're saying as long as I have a more recent graphics card I'm good to go? What were the first 4k playback supporting cards? What's cheapest? I'm no modern gamer and I prefer passive cooled cards with no fans. Thanks.

    "4k is more than resolution, and a proper HDR- or DolbyVision-capable display with perfect blacks is worth the wait." So not all 4K monitors support Ultra HD bluray playback? Especially 4K computer monitors? How can I tell the difference?

    I don't consider using standalone bluray players that hookup to your TV because I've heard rumors that older players cannot play newer movie discs. In a PC I can easily replace my player as needed. Once they stop making bluray movies and players then I'll know what the best standalone player is to buy. At that point, as an idea, I may put my digital downloads onto bluray discs for private home viewing.
    Last edited by computerdude92; September 21st, 2019 at 07:01 AM.

  9. #9

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    What about a 4k projector supporting all the required technologies? With the right model, I can have any screen size I want and have it fill up the entire wall. And no projectors on the market have any big brother smartTV-like spying features, huh?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Ever use Chromecast?

    Got any opinions, observations or suggestions?
    In my opinion who needs Chromecast if you plug in your computer to your TV to watch content from online sources? Why not have your computer be in charge of every bit of your entertainment fun than relying on multiple devices?

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