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Thread: Tech usage plans for when I settle down

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxtherabbit View Post
    I believe that when most people extol the virtues of "patience" what they are really lauding is deliberate action. I'm 100% behind making all actions deliberate and measured, just doing so in the shortest amount of time possible
    One thing that I've learned about coding is never to write code to a problem on impulse. Let it sink in, go away and don't think about it. It's remarkable how much clearer your thoughts are when you return to the problem. I still prefer pencil and paper for sketching my code out.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    One thing that I've learned about coding is never to write code to a problem on impulse. Let it sink in, go away and don't think about it. It's remarkable how much clearer your thoughts are when you return to the problem. I still prefer pencil and paper for sketching my code out.
    You need to agile harder, bruh! Move fast and break things! Gets you to the gym faster

  3. #13
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    Or, in my case, the ER.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by computerdude92 View Post
    My plan to raise my future children
    ...will change when you actually have children. Adhere to the principles you hold most dear, adapt to what is difficult, and jettison the rest. Parenting is hard enough without trying to hold onto ideals that aren't practical. (I'm not saying your vision isn't practical, but "no TV" will change to "give the screaming kid a tablet to watch education programs so that we can get through this 6-hour car ride without killing each other".)
    Offering a bounty for:
    - The software "Overhead Express" (doesn't have to be original, can be a copy)
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775, Olivetti M24, or Logabax 1600
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    One thing that I've learned about coding is never to write code to a problem on impulse. Let it sink in, go away and don't think about it. It's remarkable how much clearer your thoughts are when you return to the problem. I still prefer pencil and paper for sketching my code out.
    Same for engineering. Seen plenty of people have a thought and then get the order pad out instead of thinking it over a while and seeing the dead end.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    One thing that I've learned about coding is never to write code to a problem on impulse. Let it sink in, go away and don't think about it. It's remarkable how much clearer your thoughts are when you return to the problem. I still prefer pencil and paper for sketching my code out.
    Hmm... I agree, for an algorithm problem or something that has to interact with your stuff (which you probably know pretty well). Discovering how to get what you want out of a library or API seems to suit the impulse approach - just bash away at it until you've discovered the gap between the documentation and reality, get something like what you hoped for, or bounce off. The trend away from "paper first" to "impulse" just follows, rather than leads, the massive swing from having to do most things yourself, to operating in a huge landscape of pre-existing components... for good and bad.

    Back to the original topic, I have a real fear that kids I see growing up in an age of near-seamless interfaces have a hard time understanding that the computer is a thing that you can understand how it works, or find interest in controlling, rather than it just being a route to a game or video. It turns out that if the only computer available is a raspberry pi that only has the command line, you can get them over that An artificial recreation of the way early home computers bred a whole generation of techies because you had to understand at least a bit in order to get the machine to do anything interesting.

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