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Thread: Using high rpm fans with a fan controller

  1. #11
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    If all your components are low power, there isn't a need for massive airflow or cooling. If you had the need, you could place fans to blow directly on specific components. Not a straitforward affair though, as I've already mentioned. But doable.

    Works great for solitaire:

    20191004_103532.jpg1570199867769105071303.jpg

    And don't ask me why the photos got rotated 90 degrees counterclockwise.
    Last edited by tipc; October 4th, 2019 at 07:40 AM.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    And don't ask me why the photos got rotated 90 degrees counterclockwise.
    Don't need to ask. Most of us know why this occurs and take the necessary steps to avoid it.
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  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Kossow View Post
    keep an eye on the filters, especially if the case is sitting on the floor
    also, the filters go on the incoming air side
    so if you don't have a fan pulling air in, the filters need to go wherever air is being drawn in

    too much airflow just means the filters will clog up faster

    I generally build systems with passive intake and active output behind the hottest parts of the system
    Why wouldn't putting fan filters on all fans, including the front, sides, and back of the case - and the CPU heatsink fan not matter?
    Last edited by computerdude92; October 4th, 2019 at 09:22 AM.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Only if you have so many fans blowing out and not enough air coming into the case AND you have an old style case where the Power supply has to fight for that air coming in to cool itself (new cases put the PS in the bottom with a cutout to get air from outside the case).

    Generally on a new system you need to run Coretemp and GPU-z to monitor temperature of the CPU and GPU during heavy use on a hot ambient day to see if you are going to have a problem.
    I have the NZXT Adamas case. It has a lot of 120mm fan slots but the PSU mounts at the top. Is it still a good case, seeing the advanced cooling?

    I thought having the PSU on the bottom was a bad idea, seeing dust can easily build up on top of it.

  5. #15

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    https://www.overclockersclub.com/rev...t_adamas/7.htm

    Someone installed an 89W/103W Pentium 4 system inside when the case first came out. So it appears I don't have to worry so much?

    There appears to be too many intake fan mounts on my case. What if I reversed the side fans so they blow air out?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by computerdude92 View Post
    Why wouldn't putting fan filters on all fans, including the front, sides, and back of the case not matter? Why not protect all fans from clogs?
    The filters are to keep dust out of the case so having them on fans blowing out defeats the purpose of that. Plus how would you mount them anyway since filters are part of the case itself usually.
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  7. #17
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    You want filtered air to blow into the case--having airflow in the reverse direction is bad news for things like CD and floppy drives. I've been guilty of opening PSUs just to change the airflow direction.

    There does (or used to) exist filters with airflow restriction detection. Industrial rack-mount cases usually have large filters and fans that blow clean air into the case.

    Perhaps the worst "innovation" was the floor stand that allowed one to sit a PC XT or AT on its side on the floor, where all the dirt resides.

  8. #18
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    Industrial cases have such a high air flow in a confined space (high velocity) that I don't think much dust would would stay in the case (but maybe stick to a hot CPU heatsink).

    Some filters are good for keeping sand, hair, and large particles out but won't stop smokers soot.
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    You should definitely not smoke in rooms where computer equipment is working. Especially industrial.

  10. #20
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    If by industrial you mean like server cases, nope they can get filthy just like desktop PCs. The reason they don't is when properly installed in server rooms with heavy duty A/C filtering, there isn't much dust in the air to get sucked in.

    But in places where they throw servers in random closets or in kitchens, they get horrible.

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