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Thread: Should I save this A2M2010?

  1. #1
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    Default Should I save this A2M2010?

    Long story short - I used a freight forwarder called MyUS. I've used them for years to help me buy stuff that is US shipping only, and generally they're pretty good. Lately however, they've kinda been slipping up. Case in point, the Rev 0 Apple II I bought recently. It came with an A2M2010 monitor I wasn't too keen on and didn't expect would survive shipping anyway. I tried to get the seller to ship directly to Canada because going to MyUS meant extra risk of things going wrong. I also asked that they separate the two pieces. Nope. They bubblewrapped and tossed both into the same box. Both seemed to survive that ordeal. I then paid for MyUS's extra padding/fragile item packing, hoping they'd do a better job of securing things. Nope. Their idea of fragile item packing was tossing both items into the box without even the original bubblewrap (though they tossed that into the box with them), a couple pieces of foam, and that was it. The Rev 0 survived, thank god. But the A2M2010 took a beating. All four of the plastic mounts the CRT bolts into on the front bezel broke, pieces of the grille were smashed, some chunks from the side of the case broke off. I'm amazed the CRT didn't break, although it looks like the connector at the end of the CRT got pulled/bent slightly out. Don't know for sure.

    Anyway, I'm wondering how best to fix this, or if I should even bother given how cheap and plentiful A2M2010s are. I never intended to collect one -- can't think of a reason why I'd want to run a color computer in monochrome, other than to feel like I'm back in 6th grade.

    The key thing is, I don't want to touch or mess with the CRT. I've been bitten twice and i'm done with that. I don't trust that I could discharge it safely. The standoff screws are right in tight by the CRT tube itself. I don't want to risk touching that.

    I'm thinking for the mounts, I just use gorilla glue, and then turn the monitor so that the CRT face is facing down, using gravity to fuse them back together. I have all the 'tines' from the grille, so I can glue those back in. Just wondering if anyone thinks this is a bad idea. I don't *see* any physical damage to the CRT or its electronics, but that doesn't mean there isn't any. Main thing: I don't want it to be unsafe to operate.

    Here's some pics:

    20191006_195515.jpg

    20191006_195521.jpg

    20191006_195526.jpg

    20191006_195547.jpg

    20191006_195550.jpg

    20191006_195641.jpg

  2. #2
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    Don't use Gorilla glue--or any "glue" at all. Use a solvent cement and the repair can be just as strong as the original--and may not even be noticeable.

    However, the "cloudiness in the shot of the CRT neck bothers me. Could be that the magic smoke has been let out; in which case the monitor is kaput without a transplant.

  3. #3
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    Dang. I didn't see that. I thought the CRT was okay.. I've usually seen the CRT develop a black spot once the vacuum lets out. Didn't see that on this one.

    Would it be safe to try a power up if it is empty?

  4. #4

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    You have nothing to lose. Prepare to quickly unplug it. You'll hear a lot of high voltage discharge, maybe some squealing, if the tube has air in it.

    A tube with air in it almost always turns white.

    Good luck: it may just be cloudy from dirt on the outside.

  5. #5
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    If you have air in the CRT the heater will probably burn out pretty quickly as well I would have thought?

    Dave

  6. #6

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    Yes, and it will light up brilliantly white (briefly).

  7. #7
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    The cloudiness may also be my busted Samsung camera. I'm looking at it now and it doesn't look toooo bad. I am more concerned about the tube basically sitting atop the circuit board. Don't know if I should worry about shorts.

    I recall doing something like this now.. I accidentally bumped the neck on my NEC APC CRT and heard the hiss of air leaving. I accidentally powered it up when I flicked on a power board without realizing it was plugged in. Made a very loud 'zoom' kinda sound.

  8. #8

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    That cloudiness may be the “getter” vaporized or the filament is a little old which is normal. My experience is that CRT’s either lose vacuum in spectacular fashion or the little nipple at the end develops a crack/or is broken off. I don’t think you can do any harm to the electronics running a tube that has gone to air, at least not these sizes/power levels of tubes.

  9. #9
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    Yeah. I don't think it's actually broken.. I think my cam is misrepresenting thing (darn Samsung). It looks ok to me. I was a bit concerned about the piece on the end (don't know what it's called) being slightly bent, but it's only slightly so.. there's no sign of a crack or anything. In my experience when they vent out, you usually get a dark black spot on the screen. I don't see that here.

    The only thing I'm concerned about with trying to power up is, it's not mounted to the case anymore and is basically sitting on plastic risers, maybe a sliver above the CRT PCB. I'm worried about it grounding out on something. I'm thinking I should get it glued back together and clear of the PCB before I try anything.

  10. #10
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    Dang.

    I did figure out a way using JB weld to reattach the screen to its mounts. But when I looked more closely at the CRT neck, I could see what looked like possible little cracks in the very tiny end of the glass that pokes through whatever that little PCB at the far end is. Anyway, I gave it a 2 second power up and heard the distinctive 'whirr' of a leaked CRT.. and unplugged. This one unfortunately did not survive, I don't think.

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