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Thread: When Buying Software

  1. #11
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malc View Post
    Been going on for a long time i think, There is / was a seller on ebah selling DOS 6.22 on 4 1.44M floppies with home printed labels and they sold hundreds of sets, I've also seen Win 3 / 95 Floppy disc sets Not original and just a single non-original boot floppy's for £5 a pop, and people buy them.
    Last I looked, ebay's policy on selling software was both forbidden and not all that well monitored.
    A lot of those listings use a loophole where you are selling the diskettes and not the actual software.
    = Excellent space heater

  2. #12
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    That's funny, there used to be a seller that would flag any listing for a PC that included MS-DOS without a license or original set of disks!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    That's funny, there used to be a seller that would flag any listing for a PC that included MS-DOS without a license or original set of disks!
    Yes because he was trying to sell his inflated priced systems with disks. You can install FreeDOS to get around that.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by NeXT View Post
    Last I looked, ebay's policy on selling software was both forbidden and not all that well monitored.
    A lot of those listings use a loophole where you are selling the diskettes and not the actual software.
    Yes Ebah clamped down on the selling of software years ago, Apparently big M put their foot down because people were buying full versions of older software cheap and then buying upgrade versions of newer software, There was a big hooha about it at the time as a lot of sellers had all listings removed and a lot did not. It still goes on today though some sellers seem to get away with it.

  5. #15
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    Many, many sellers get away with it. I won't get into specifics. Downright illegal sales go on constantly and no one seems to care. Some people still ship the odd piece of useless unrelated hardware to circumvent some rule.

  6. #16

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    I've only left negative feedback once when after I paid I never got any further communication. eBay refunded my money.

    I have left no feedback in instances where someone tells me the item can't be found and immediately returns my money. That might warrant a neutral but I just let it slide. It would definitely be a negative if I saw it relisted.

    Another instance was where I got a two disc set advertised as "tested". When I opened the case, only disc 2 (a soundtrack) was there. Contacted the seller who insisted both discs were there when sent. On a hunch, I asked if maybe he left the disc in his drive. Since his friend had tested the disc, he asked his friend and sure enough the disc was in his friend's machine...but his friend threw it out thinking it wasn't needed. I had already agreed to a partial refund, the item was cheap enough and the manual was worth the price I paid. I left no feedback for this either.

    When given a refund because keys are missing, I usually do not leave feedback. On the one hand, the software is useless unless keys can be found, on the other hand I get refunded. It's a hassle, but it is a wash.

    Joe

  7. #17

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    I purchase quite a bit of software and hardware on eBay. Once or twice, I've had the seller say they can't find it and refund me. That's fine. Many of these are mom-and-pop running out of the basement. I read item descriptions carefully both for what is stated and what is not stated. I also examine the purchase extra carefully when the seller doesn't offer returns. When I do buy, I go into it knowing it's a calculated risk. I've been extremely fortunate that every bit of software I've received has been readable and working, from CDROMs all the way down to 5.25" media.

    Bottom line, if the description doesn't say, then ask.
    1. If it ends up unusable and seller makes it right, then positive.
    2. If seller said the working state was unknown, then if it doesn't work (which has happened to me a handful of times), go back to rule #1.
    3. If sellers listing didn't offer returns but disclosed unknown state, then still positive. (I'll still ask for refund, but if not then ok. I assumed the risk.)
    4. if seller completely misrepresented, then I would go back to rule #1. If they make it right, probably neutral feedback. If they don't, then *probably* leave negative feedback. However, I assume the seller is going to leave me negative feedback as a reprisal. (Some sellers wait for my feedback before they leave theirs, which is BS because I fulfilled my half by paying within a few ours after winning an auction!) I've never had to leave negative, so not sure if I'd actually do it.


    At the end of the day, it's a risk. As we learned from the Brady Bunch: Caveat emptor.
    Last edited by normanator; October 18th, 2019 at 08:44 AM.
    “The Bex religious impulse does have its collective side. As in, collect everything and hold on to it whether you remember where it came from or not.”
    —Alberto Fossa, Privateer 2

  8. #18

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    I have plan to buy or install some apps for my website. It connected to e commerce because I have online shop.

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