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Thread: How to remove spray paint from Mac Plus?

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by NeXT View Post
    I stand by my statement and encourage its use. I have been using it as the primary means of stripping paint off plastics for years now and have not yet run into an instance where it negatively reacted with the plastic.
    Not all dot3 brake fluids are made equal, I definitely want to test it in a small spot that is not visible like on the back first.

    What about acetone? I don't know how it will affect the plastic, probably not good for it. But I know its used to strip cheap paint.
    I have dyslexia, I have alot of trouble putting my thoughts into words and spelling/grammar is something I struggle with.
    You may need to read my posts twice to understand what I said.

  2. #22
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    Acetone is death on some plastics. VOCs, in general, save alcohols are not good news.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Acetone is death on some plastics. VOCs, in general, save alcohols are not good news.
    That is good to know. Do you or anyone else know what plastics acetone does not mix well with.
    I'm guessing goof off would be a big NO too. If I'm not mistaken it has alot of acetone in it too.
    I have dyslexia, I have alot of trouble putting my thoughts into words and spelling/grammar is something I struggle with.
    You may need to read my posts twice to understand what I said.

  4. #24
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    Acetone is death to styrene--and, probably, by extension, ABS. It's not friendly to PVC either.

  5. #25

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    Have a look at post #30 on this thread at the two photos there:

    http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...ht=retrobright

    I restored a very yellow Apple monitor to new looking condition with the aid of a certain paint, Holts Duplicolor. It has interesting physical properties interacting with plastic. It has a very fast drying solvent, that etches into the surface of many plastics in the short time frame it takes for the solvent to dry. Also it can be applied in a very thin coat as the spray is fine and not splattery in globules. As a result some interesting things happen. It etches into the surface to create a bond that is as strong as the plastic itself. It doesn't obscure the surface texture of the plastic. When dry if you scratch the surface there is no flaking or separation of the paint and its almost impossible to tell the plastic has been painted unless you look with magnification into the depth of a test scratch and you can tell its a little yellow in there. In effect you have created a new plastic surface that has become one with the original plastic. Its not like a film sitting on the surface waiting to peel off, which is what would happen with other paints.

    This is my preference for restoring yellowed plastic the reasoning being : it protects the underlying plastic from more light damage and degradation and it avoids any chemical attack of the original plastic with bleaching or oxidizing agents which I think further damage plastic. In other words its a plastic preserving technique. But it cannot be any old paint or it could be a disaster for the plastic and make a real mess of it, it has to be this particular paint to assure the proper bond with the plastic surface and the retention of surface texture.

    So my advice to the OP would be, after the incorrect paint has been successfully removed (hopefully) use the Holts duplicolor to restore it. But it still will require a good surface.

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