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Thread: Do we really need to upgrade?

  1. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcdosretro View Post
    Windows 10 sucks because of telemetry . . .
    W10 telemetry can be disabled with a simple registry edit and 2 adjustments in 'services.msc'.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  2. #162

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    Quote Originally Posted by lowen View Post
    Hmmm, on my CentOS laptop when I plug in a USB drive it comes up automatically, and instead of a cryptic drive letter I get to access it by its name (or its short UID, if no name/label). It Just Works on CentOS with the default desktop environment. EDIT: And I can mount more than 26 drives if I'd like.... (yes, I HAVE done that on a backup server on a VMware ESX host that needed a 32TB filesystem, in 1TB chunks (thank you, LVM, for chaining those 32 drives (well, actually, since they were on an EMC Clariion, the correct term is LUNs instead of drives) together into a single partition). I HAVE systems where the standard drive device name rolled from /dev/sdz to /dev/sdaa and beyond (highest I've personally seen was /dev/sdbj).

    For what it's worth, Windows has had the ability to mount partitions and drives into a filesystem folder for a long time. So you CAN if you'd like take a system that boots from SSD and has a large hard drive for user data take that large hard drive and mount it to \Users\$username (I do this kind of thing now with Linux; my boot SSD and my two 1TB hard drives (Dell Precision M6700; one mSATA slot plus two SATA bays) all mounted, with the hard drives mounted to /home and /opt, respectively.
    I already knew that but I've never needed to use that. Linux people sure like a lot of unnecessary typing - E: is shorter than /dev/sda or the like and it's not cryptic. Remembering a UID is cryptic.

    Does it auto-mount if you're not in the GUI ? The Raspbian GUI will auto-mount but there's nothing there to do so from the command line.

    Quote Originally Posted by lowen View Post
    It's called modularity, and, in my opinion it is a brilliant design.
    Nope, it's crap design or at the very least an outdated archaic design. Worse if there is better and more elegant design but it's in an MS OS then the Linux guys will cry foul just because it was done by MS which is really ridiculous.

  3. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    W10 telemetry can be disabled with a simple registry edit and 2 adjustments in 'services.msc'.
    You are sure it will stay disabled? I've heard of updates magically re-enabling it, but I've never messed with it myself.

    In my opinion, any software that attempts to make a remote connection without my explicit consent is malware.

  4. #164
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    Many Linux desktops mount an external device only if opened with a file manager.

    If you want auto-mount from a CLI, edit /etc/fstab to reflect that.

    UUID isn't the only option for partition naming; you can also use labels or device serial numbers as well as the old-style device attachment numbers (e.g. /dev/sda). The UUID thing was done to establish a fixed basis for multiple device usage. If you have several interfaces, you're not guaranteed that they'll always come up in the same order, which can lead to issues with exactly what /dev/sdb1 refers to.

    There are arguably better operating systems than either Unix or Windows. Obviously, Apple thought that--and many still think the BeOS was only a casualty in the desktop wars.
    Last edited by Chuck(G); November 2nd, 2019 at 06:37 PM.

  5. #165

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    There are arguably better operating systems than either Unix or Windows.
    ... e.g., DOS.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  6. #166
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    You mean CP/M?

    Actually, there have been several non-x86 DOSes. I think that the term "Operating System" is strictly IBM-ese in origin. Other vendors called the resident file and resource management "monitor" or "executive". IBM at one time used the term "monitor' (e.g. 1620 Monitor IID or 7090 FMS (FORTRAN Monitor System)) UNIVAC called theirs EXEC for "executive". "Control Program" was another popular term (e.g. Burroughs MCP). CDC used the term "monitor" loosely to refer to the resident control program and associated drivers; "operating system" generally referred to the whole shebang of resident and utilities, e.g. KRONOS.
    Last edited by Chuck(G); November 2nd, 2019 at 06:47 PM.

  7. #167

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    Quote Originally Posted by SomeGuy View Post
    You are sure it will stay disabled? I've heard of updates magically re-enabling it, but I've never messed with it myself.

    In my opinion, any software that attempts to make a remote connection without my explicit consent is malware.
    I've heard this as well in addition to some services checking every few days and re-enabling telemetry if it was disabled. Again why does MS need to collect this info in the first place and why are they so insistent on it to the point of having this sort of sneaky stuff in there ? If a website did this most users would cry foul, why does anyone think this is OK for an OS ? It's much worse for an OS to do this.

    Warning: if you use Windows 7 don't apply the convenience rollup, it also includes telemetry. Stick with SP1 only.

    Even if telemetry wasn't present, there's still the issue of forced auto-updates, unnecessary stuff which can't be removed, bloat and no useful features beyond Windows 7. Windows 10 is a hard pass, no thanks.

  8. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by SomeGuy View Post
    You are sure it will stay disabled? I've heard of updates magically re-enabling it, but I've never messed with it myself.

    In my opinion, any software that attempts to make a remote connection without my explicit consent is malware.
    You know it could happen but in this case I don't think so. Simple enough to keep tabs on the registry by just checking to see if the key got modified back after a major MS update. In the meantime, you're not blasting your stuff out to the folks in Redmond.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  9. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcdosretro View Post
    I already knew that but I've never needed to use that. Linux people sure like a lot of unnecessary typing - E: is shorter than /dev/sda or the like and it's not cryptic. Remembering a UID is cryptic.

    Does it auto-mount if you're not in the GUI ? The Raspbian GUI will auto-mount but there's nothing there to do so from the command line.
    Well, I did say 'CentOS with the default desktop environment' in my post. While I have not used it personally, there is a package called 'usbmount' that may do what you need and should be part of Raspbian and easily installed with apt. As far as typing UUID's or device names, there is always the handy "mount LABEL='MyFiles' /mnt" shortcut, and labeling the filesystem isn't hard (from the CLI, if it's a FAT-formatted stick, it would be done with the 'fatlabel' command from the dosfsutils package; at least that's its name on CentOS). All of this is on CentOS; there might possibly be minor variations to Raspbian. I use my CentOS system in the GNOME GUI, so even though I'll typically have four to twenty terminals open at a given time I do use some of the GUI tools where they make sense; the GNOME Disk Utility is nice and lets me format, mount, label, and do other things with disks of all kinds.

    Further with UUIDs and labels, though, on CentOS at least, there is the 'blkid' command that scans all attached filesystems and prints out information about them, including labels and UUIDs.

    Nope, it's crap design or at the very least an outdated archaic design. Worse if there is better and more elegant design but it's in an MS OS then the Linux guys will cry foul just because it was done by MS which is really ridiculous.
    Microsoft's Xenix used that kind of modularity. FWIW, powershell uses a similar modularity if I read it correctly (and I may not be reading it correctly; that's not my area of greatest expertise). With modularity the shell becomes a programming language interpreter and should be treated accordingly (I use for loops frequently from the interactive shell). Some people, on Linux, Windows, and macOS, actually start up a programming language interpreter and use it directly as their shell (the python interpreter gets quite a bit of use in the STEM fields like that, where interactive use of libraries like AstroPy and AstroPlan are most easily used straight from the interpreter's CLI).

    And, speaking of the CLI, well, doing things from a CLI is no worse nor any more opaque nor any more arcane than using regedit in Windows to diddle some bit in some key in the hive HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE (or was it HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT.... or HKEY_CURRENT_USER...). (hive... who thought that wonderfully mnemonic name up?)
    --
    Thus spake Tandy Xenix System III version 3.2: "Bughlt: Sckmud Shut her down Scotty, she's sucking mud again!"

  10. #170

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    Quote Originally Posted by lowen View Post
    Well, I did say 'CentOS with the default desktop environment' in my post. While I have not used it personally, there is a package called 'usbmount' that may do what you need and should be part of Raspbian and easily installed with apt. As far as typing UUID's or device names, there is always the handy "mount LABEL='MyFiles' /mnt" shortcut, and labeling the filesystem isn't hard (from the CLI, if it's a FAT-formatted stick, it would be done with the 'fatlabel' command from the dosfsutils package; at least that's its name on CentOS). All of this is on CentOS; there might possibly be minor variations to Raspbian. I use my CentOS system in the GNOME GUI, so even though I'll typically have four to twenty terminals open at a given time I do use some of the GUI tools where they make sense; the GNOME Disk Utility is nice and lets me format, mount, label, and do other things with disks of all kinds.

    Further with UUIDs and labels, though, on CentOS at least, there is the 'blkid' command that scans all attached filesystems and prints out information about them, including labels and UUIDs.


    Microsoft's Xenix used that kind of modularity. FWIW, powershell uses a similar modularity if I read it correctly (and I may not be reading it correctly; that's not my area of greatest expertise). With modularity the shell becomes a programming language interpreter and should be treated accordingly (I use for loops frequently from the interactive shell). Some people, on Linux, Windows, and macOS, actually start up a programming language interpreter and use it directly as their shell (the python interpreter gets quite a bit of use in the STEM fields like that, where interactive use of libraries like AstroPy and AstroPlan are most easily used straight from the interpreter's CLI).

    And, speaking of the CLI, well, doing things from a CLI is no worse nor any more opaque nor any more arcane than using regedit in Windows to diddle some bit in some key in the hive HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE (or was it HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT.... or HKEY_CURRENT_USER...). (hive... who thought that wonderfully mnemonic name up?)
    Yes the Windows registry is a mess. It was originally intended to solve the problem of a large number of .ini files from Windows 3.x but quickly mushroomed into a bigger mess. I don't blindly tout Windows, it has a lot of problems of its own. I'm just saying the DOS/Windows command shell paradigm is superior to that of Unix/Linux and that Windows does certain things better like auto-mounting and not having case-sensitive filenames. There are other issues as well (e.g. Visual Studio as bloated as it is beats any of the Linux IDEs).

    I don't like powershell because it's too Linux-like.

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