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Thread: Linux Mint 19 for Newbies

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    If I were you I'd be upset at the total lack of documentation of Cinnamon.

    This is one of my biggest beefs with Linux:. Too many distrus.

    You could always install some other desktop environment. I too use XFCE4; it might not be up to your expectations, but might be worth a try just to start out. You could always switch to Cinnamon, or any other desktop any time you like.
    Thanks for your input. It was eenie-meanie-miney-moe and Cinnamon 19.2 came out on top. It's fast; i.e, clickity-click. Steam is up and running and I'll know more later on today.
    Last edited by Agent Orange; November 4th, 2019 at 09:43 AM.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    The desktop environment division is purely the fault of the Gnome developers when they decided that all users needed to be using a Apple IOS tablet interface instead of the traditional desktop environment. This is the same reason "Metro" was almost universally hated and was mostly killed of by MS after user revolt. The Gnome devs tried to make amends by creating "GNOME Flashback", which is a horrible GNOME 2 like emulator, but it had pretty poor reviews because it was ugly and stripped pretty much all user customization.
    Gah, yes. The GNOME 3 debacle was the thing that drove me off GNOME permanently; it wasn't just the terrible design, but the devs' naked contempt for anyone who dared disagree with their Grand Vision and just wanted a no-frills reasonably-customizable desktop environment like they'd had all along with GNOME 2. And then the same damn thing happened over at Microsoft, where a bunch of self-styled Designers decided to throw convention and familiarity out the window in a bad attempt to chase the success of iOS, with similar results.

    (It's doubly irritating that we're still stuck with the same fart-sniffers handling the GTK toolkit; I've ended up switching to Qt versions of multiple programs just so I can get away from that stupid GTK3 file dialog that tries to suggest locations it thinks I might want to open/save something every time it pops up instead of just defaulting to my home directory or the last-used path...)

    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    Yes. This may get me on the right track. TYVM. It all about the syntax. I'm going to have to bone up on basic Linux. An other good winter project about to take off.
    It really does require just setting some time aside to sit down and wrap one's head around some different ways of doing things.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  3. #13
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    Not everything is based on Debian. OpenSuSE is its own thing and there are some distros based on RedHat like Fedora and CentOS.
    I should have been more specific. Most distributions as tabulated by Distrowatch use the "official" Linux/Debian kernel, but by no means all. There are microkernel versions as well as BSD/AT&T derivatives, such as xxxBSD and Solaris/illumos.

    (I started using RH with version 4.1, I think. Still have the distribution medium). There are other Linuces based on RH, such as Mac Yellowdog and Mandriva),

    I still have the distribution CDs and packaging for some version of Yggdrasil; I don't think I ever installed it.

    I've got a lot of old Linux distribution media. I'm looking at something from 2002 from IBM called the "Linux Software Evaluation Kit".

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    Steam is up and running and I'll know more later on today.
    I would be very interested to hear what you think of performance compared to Windows. Games will of course be a good test of this. I have not tried Linux (or anything else) on modern hardware. But I was upset at the unusability of Linux for my purposes with what is now older hardware.


  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    I would be very interested to hear what you think of performance compared to Windows. Games will of course be a good test of this. I have not tried Linux (or anything else) on modern hardware. But I was upset at the unusability of Linux for my purposes with what is now older hardware.

    It's going to be a while before I can run 'my' games on MINT. I was able to download and install WINE, but here's the rub; can't get the graphical interface to light off. I can get to a command line and invoke some code, but that's a lot of work when compared to simply clicking on an icon. I've been searching and looking at videos all afternoon on how to get WINE up and working, but nothing so far for the Cinnamon 19.2's graphical desktop. And yes, there's a ton written about all of this. WINE-HQ itself has a good site but doesn't address specific issues. Next step is to jump into some MINT forums.

    Otherwise, it's a nice piece of work. My PC system is new and it installed all of the drivers including the Nvidia 1080. Also, my el cheapo Canon MF240 bluetooth printer came right up. There were no configurations issues with the network either. I kind of get the feeling that the MINT install routine peeked in at my W10 installation for some help. Worth mentioning is Libreoffice is included in the package. There is a resident guru who prompts you on various update routines and another who points you to some nice apps. One irritating issue that everytime you invoke 'sudo' in the terminal you need to supply your password. This appears to be 'built in' and there's no way around it. There must be a way to enlarge the fonts on the desktop as they are very small, but so far I haven't discovered how. While browsing, I ran into a note stating that yet another new version, Cinnamon 19.3, will be released in December.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  6. #16
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    The "sudo" thing is native Linux behavior, but there's a time aspect to it. Do a number of "sudo" things right in a row in a short time and the password is only requested for the first one. You can also simply "sudo bash" or "sudo sh", or whatever your preferred shell is. Unix "su" is also still supported.

    As far as cinnamon 19 font size, look no further

  7. #17

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    I know that this is considered to be punishable by guillotine in Linux circles, but I always either log in as "root" or use "su". I'm not sure if that's wise for a newbie though; it would be very easy to render the whole system unusable and needing reinstallation, just doing mundane tasks.

    My memory of Linux is lacking at the moment, but isn't there a group a user can belong to that gives the user "sudo" access without asking for the root password? "wheel" or something like that? Whatever it is, I have done it because on none of my Linux machines do I ever get asked for the root password when I'm logged in as me (not "root").

  8. #18
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    Sure, just use usermod or useradd and add yourself to the "root" group.

    You can also edit /etc/passwd.

    I prefer not to do it as I don't trust myself not to do something stupid like "rm -rf *"

    You can live as dangerously as you want.
    Last edited by Chuck(G); November 4th, 2019 at 05:48 PM.

  9. #19

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    In the early days of Linux, I was very active on IRC. IRC gives away the login username of your local computer! I would frequently get kicked out of channels with the message "Don't use the internet as root!!!" Sometimes they would get aggressive and ping flood me. Little did they know, I was using Amiga: there is no user "root" or anything else. "root" was the default username of the TCP/IP stack just because it shouldn't matter!

  10. #20

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    Count me in for just using su instead; of course, if you're having to get root privileges on a regular basis for something, it's worth investigating whether to just adjust groups or permissions to obviate the need (example: for some dang reason serial connections out of the machine are considered privileged by default, which makes it a pain in the ass to, say, use a null-modem cable with an SBC or what-have-you,) but as a general quick-and-easy solution for short sessions of administrative work, I've never had a problem with it.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

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