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Thread: Use png or tiff "print screen" for best quality screenshots of pictures on the web?

  1. #1

    Default Use png or tiff "print screen" for best quality screenshots of pictures on the web?

    Should I use tiff or png or some other container to save the absolute best quality web screenshots? I read png is 8 bit color palate and tiff is 16 bit color palate, but I read somewhere else that png supports up to 48-bit true color. That's much higher than the 8 bit color max many sites report png can do. I'm confused.

    tiff, despite being said to be the best quality format, has problems with transparency. So how can it be called the best image container?

    I don't know everything about this stuff.

  2. #2

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    Use PNG. It absolutely does support 24-bit RGB and 32-bit RGBA "True Color" images, and is widely supported (even late versions of Netscape 4.x can display them natively). The 8/16-bit values you quoted were likely referring to the bit depth per channel.

  3. #3
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    Both TIFF and PNG support multiple color standards, but PNG is more appropriate for web use. TIFF is a very old format created in the 1980s by Aldus (now known as Adobe) for desktop publishing and scanning, it's not really appropriate for web use since file sizes tend to get huge quick.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by loblolly986 View Post
    Use PNG. It absolutely does support 24-bit RGB and 32-bit RGBA "True Color" images, and is widely supported (even late versions of Netscape 4.x can display them natively). The 8/16-bit values you quoted were likely referring to the bit depth per channel.
    What is the difference between bit depth per channel and regular color bit depth?

  5. #5

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    "Regular" bit depth is listed in total - i.e. 24-bit color is 8 bits each of the red, green, and blue color channels. Per-channel bit depth is specifically referring to the size of one pixel's worth of data in one channel - PNG supports not just the standard 8-bit channels (256 possible values per color element,) but 16-bit as well (65,536 possible values per color element.) This is mostly of interest to people who are into professional image-processing, since pretty much everything but that (and I think some high-end gaming now?) only ever bothers with 8 bits per channel.
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  6. #6

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    Thanks for the answer. Why do people who do professional image processing need to worry about bits per channel?

  7. #7

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    Because higher bitdepth per-channel means higher precision and/or greater range, which means less loss of data when converting image sources to digital or greater accuracy when specifying digital image data to an output device for printing/display.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by computerdude92 View Post
    Why do people who do professional image processing need to worry about bits per channel?
    Because the more data you have to work with, the less data that is lost when you manipulate the image.
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by commodorejohn View Post
    Because higher bitdepth per-channel means higher precision and/or greater range, which means less loss of data when converting image sources to digital or greater accuracy when specifying digital image data to an output device for printing/display.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trixter View Post
    Because the more data you have to work with, the less data that is lost when you manipulate the image.
    Nice paraphrase...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Nice paraphrase...
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