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Thread: Iomega Clik! Disk connected to iPhone?

  1. #1

    Default Iomega Clik! Disk connected to iPhone?

    Remember Iomega Clik! Disks? The micro floppy was so small and thin that the drive mech for them was encased inside a PCMCIA card.

    But how do you get a PCMCIA connected to an iPhone? Enjoy!

    https://youtu.be/HJSd3D39wyk

  2. #2
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    I didn't know that there was originally a PCMCIA adapter card for the Iomega Clik! disks.

    The only Clik! drive I ever saw was a native USB drive, not a USB adapter for the PCMCIA adapter. I should still have at least one of the native USB Clik! drives in a box somewhere in my garage that I haven't used in close to 20 years.

  3. #3

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    I saw a NEC dock on eBay recently for Clik! disks, and it looked to contain a direct drive. But I wasn't sure if it would work. The PCMCIA cards are common, so if one breaks, you just get another and slide it through the Iomega pass through dock. Convoluted, but modular.

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    Iomega did a lot of variations on the PocketZip/Clik drive. There was a PCMCIA card with a drive inside the card. A second type of PCMCIA card was designed for the Clik! Mobile which connected through a cable. The cable used for the Clik! Mobile was similar in proportion to a USB cable. http://www.steves-digicams.com/acces...l-cameras.html covers the Rube Goldberg style of the Clik! Mobile with parallel port dock, battery, and flash card reader though not a picture of the PCMCIA card with the cable connection. The USB PocketZip was a simplified version of the device.

    In an amusing side note, the cheapest way to get a USB connection to a Clik! disk was to pick up the HipZip music player though largely because of how fast the HipZip hit the clearance aisle.

  5. #5
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    Did you just ... pronounce PCMCIA as "pickymicky"? Throughout the whole video?

    Ooooo-kay.

    Honestly I tried to watch the whole thing but I just could not get past that. It's like listening to a segfault.
    Last edited by xjas; November 20th, 2019 at 03:00 AM.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by xjas View Post
    Did you just ... pronounce PCMCIA as "pickymicky"? Throughout the whole video?

    Ooooo-kay.

    Honestly I tried to watch the whole thing but I just could not get past that. It's like listening to a segfault.
    Ooooo-kay, tough guy.

  7. #7
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    Probably a regional pronunciation thing -- like ell-eee-dee vs. led.

    I remember these showing up super cheap from various online computer parts places when IOmega discontinued them. Almost bought one, but went for a PCMCIA SmartMedia adapter instead. I definitely thought SmartMedia was going to be *the* removable media of the future!

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    Quote Originally Posted by xjas View Post
    Did you just ... pronounce PCMCIA as "pickymicky"? Throughout the whole video?.
    It was a new term for me as well. We always just called them PC cards back in the day. I polled a lot of the people I know who have been in PC repair/IT for the last few decades and none of them have ever heard that term either. Must be a regional thing, though I am unclear what region as I have done this IT thing in 2 countries and on both sides of the US.

    I am actually amazed that the iPhone still supports USB 1.1 and iOS has support for PCMCIA cards. OP What iOS version is on your phone?

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  9. #9

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    Wait, people pronounced "LED" as "led?"
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by lutiana View Post

    I am actually amazed that the iPhone still supports USB 1.1 and iOS has support for PCMCIA cards. OP What iOS version is on your phone?
    The latest versions of USB still support 1.1, so it's not a matter of the iPhone supporting 1.1, it just comes with the package. USB 1.1 and 2.0 are closely related, so you probably won't see 1.1 go away until 2.0 is retired.

    The iOS doesn't have any PCMCIA support. The dock I placed the card into adapts the mech into USB Mass Storage, which iOS 13 now supports.

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