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Thread: Windows 2K Workstation Revived With Problems

  1. #21

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    .......anyway, I got the machine up and running with Windows 2000. The two Seagate 250GB hard-drive are now working. I simply left the jumpers in the factory "cable select" positions and used the utility that came with them to format the drives.

    The utility gave me the option of formatting them NTFS or FAT32, I used FAT32 because they will only be used for storage. Was that a wise choice?

  2. Default

    Just a matter of personal preference, I believe.

    FAT32 has a limitation of 2TB (although that won't worry you), and has no security at the file level (like FAT16).

    It should all work fine. Good luck with your CAD.

  3. #23

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    Thanks.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by acad_2k View Post
    The utility gave me the option of formatting them NTFS or FAT32, I used FAT32 because they will only be used for storage. Was that a wise choice?
    No, not really. The only real benefit FAT32 has over NTFS is that it's a leaner file system and takes up less space on a drive. This makes it good for portable media like flash drives, but not much else. exFAT has supplanted FAT32 on large portable flash media, which fixes several problems FAT32 had, but it is still not fault tolerant.

    The biggest limitation of FAT32 is the individual maximum file size limit of 4 GB. Other issues are it has zero fault tolerance, so if the drive has a hiccup or the system isn't powered off cleanly, the possibility of massive data corruption is very high. This is why data corruption was such a bad problem in Windows ME and prior, scan disk was a frequent sight back in the day, and I've spent many hours in DOS trying to recover hosed Windows installations from improper shutdowns or hardware failure causing the hard drive to act erratically.


    Quote Originally Posted by Robbbert View Post
    FAT32 has a limitation of 2TB (although that won't worry you)
    The maximum size of a FAT32 partition varies between operating systems. The theoretical limit is 16 TB with a practical limit of 8 TB, but no past or current OS supports anywhere near these numbers. Windows 98SE supported a maximum FAT32 partition size of 137 GB and later versions of Windows up to Windows 10 support a maximum of 2 TB.

  5. #25
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    If one cares to jump in and get their feet wet you could go with GPT partition and get 9 Zettabytes in W10.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

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    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    The maximum size of a FAT32 partition varies between operating systems. The theoretical limit is 16 TB with a practical limit of 8 TB, but no past or current OS supports anywhere near these numbers. Windows 98SE supported a maximum FAT32 partition size of 137 GB and later versions of Windows up to Windows 10 support a maximum of 2 TB.
    Well, I was mostly right, in practical terms.

    Talking about disk corruption, I have a second-hand (free) NAS with a 80GB hard drive using the FAT32 system. Whenever I copy a large number of small files to it, that directory area gets corrupted. What's worse, the NAS has no gentle shutdown button or procedure, all you can do is switch off the power. I suppose problems are inevitable?

  7. #27
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    Unless you can use a different file system, file corruption will be a perpetual issue.

    If the NAS uses FAT32, you can pull the drive and put it in a Windows machine to run scan disk on it and fix any file system problems and put it back in the NAS. No guarantee it won't happen again though.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    No, not really. The only real benefit FAT32 has over NTFS is that it's a leaner file system and takes up less space on a drive. This makes it good for portable media like flash drives, but not much else. exFAT has supplanted FAT32 on large portable flash media, which fixes several problems FAT32 had, but it is still not fault tolerant.

    The biggest limitation of FAT32 is the individual maximum file size limit of 4 GB. Other issues are it has zero fault tolerance, so if the drive has a hiccup or the system isn't powered off cleanly, the possibility of massive data corruption is very high. This is why data corruption was such a bad problem in Windows ME and prior, scan disk was a frequent sight back in the day, and I've spent many hours in DOS trying to recover hosed Windows installations from improper shutdowns or hardware failure causing the hard drive to act erratically.




    The maximum size of a FAT32 partition varies between operating systems. The theoretical limit is 16 TB with a practical limit of 8 TB, but no past or current OS supports anywhere near these numbers. Windows 98SE supported a maximum FAT32 partition size of 137 GB and later versions of Windows up to Windows 10 support a maximum of 2 TB.
    Thanks, I will re-format to NTFS this weekend.

  9. #29

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    Something that helped me with the PW620 and Win2000 was Dell Diagnostics from the Dell System Utilities download run from a floppy. It was spot on, telling me the CPU was running in compatability mode rather than normal mode ( a BIOS setting). Still available in 2019 from "Drivers and Downloads" section of Dell Support.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    Unless you can use a different file system, file corruption will be a perpetual issue.
    Lack of fault tolerance isn't the same thing as being the cause of faults. If corruption is a persistant issue, that is strong evidence of a hardware problem in my view.

    I've used FAT32 continuously for years at a time on several systems without problems.

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