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Thread: First YouTube video experience

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by falter View Post
    Should I persist with my vision of keeping it all in one video, or should I break it up into a small series? I'm thinking based on script length this is going to run probably over 30 minutes. There's a fair bit to cover.
    The correct answer is: You should make it as long as the videos you enjoy watching. (If you like watching all-in-one, soup-to-nuts videos, make a 30-minute video. If you get antsy at the 10-minute mark of most videos, break it up as you see fit (maybe intro/history/explanation in one video, and building/operation/conclusion in another)).

    The average view length for your last video was 7 minutes, but that doesn't mean every view was 7 minutes -- some watched for 30 seconds, and others watched the entire thing. Instead of looking at that metric, look at the Audience Retention graph on the Engagement tab, which is a graph of what the engagement was across time. If there was a sharp drop-off at a particular time index, go check that time index and see if something was obvious that you think might need improving.

    Also, don't get too hung up over metrics The most important thing to concentrate on for your first few years (seriously) is making the videos you feel you'd enjoy watching.
    Last edited by Trixter; February 5th, 2020 at 10:52 PM.
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  2. #62
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    Thanks guys. When I first set out I didn't think the TVT had enough there to cover more than 10 minutes. However now i can see it may easily cross half an hour, especially with my rundown of building one included. Like I said I'm not in it for the $, but I don't want to bore people to death either.

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by falter View Post
    Thanks guys. When I first set out I didn't think the TVT had enough there to cover more than 10 minutes. However now i can see it may easily cross half an hour, especially with my rundown of building one included. Like I said I'm not in it for the $, but I don't want to bore people to death either.
    Make the part boundaries to hook them on the line. Leave some suspense.
    Dwight

  4. #64
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    What I was thinking was maybe changing up the intro format so that it contains just one or two 2 or 3 second snippets of the 'action' further into the video. Like for example, I have some footage where I'm testing the TVT power supply... on the other side of my front door... in.. er.. protective gear. The narration would be deadpan "plus I'll take you through my experience building a TVT" with a 2 sec clip of that shown.

  5. #65
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    Sounds like a good plan. The channel The Spectrum Show does something similar, teasing the video's content. Shades of old TV programming tricks.
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  6. #66
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    That explains the YT vids with endless gabbing having little to do with the subject matter. I have little patience with those, particularly those with bad camera work.

    I'd like to see a YT viewer that speeds through a video at perhaps 5x speed until stopped for real content.

  7. #67
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    I rarely watch YT videos from start to finish at normal speed. Here are some hints:

    • Most youtube players (web, android app, TV, possibly others) allow you to speed up playback to 1.25x, 1,5x, 1.75x, or 2x while maintaining audio pitch. This is great for skimming through fluff, and 2x is useful for people who talk very slowly in their videos.
    • Most youtube players have jog controls: On the web, you can use J and L to skip forward and backward. In the android app, double-tap on the right side to skip forward (the amount in seconds is customizable in the settings) and double-tape on the left side to skip backward
    • The web YT player has shortcuts to 10%, 20%, 30%, etc. time indexes by hitting "1", "2", "3", etc. on the keyboard. Great for jumping around great distances. "0" returns to the beginning.

    For YT videos that always have a lot of preamble and repeated setup/history, I know to hit "3" right at the beginning of the video to skip to the 30% mark. This has been a practice of mine since about 2008, but I was delighted to find out it has a name: The Wadsworth Constant.
    Last edited by Trixter; February 6th, 2020 at 01:50 PM.
    Offering a bounty for:
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  8. #68

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    As for how much money the "semi-big" YouTubers make, Dave Jones of EEVBlog (700k subscribers) just posted:

    https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/y...72/#msg2903572

    Quote Originally Posted by EEVBlog
    I for one could not survive if it was just Youtube and Patreon income. US$42k last year in Adsense revenue and almost the same in Patreon income. That's pretty good money, about US$80k a year, but that's before expenses and my wife and two kids. I could earn more as a 9-5 engineer. … I only stay afloat at this because of the additional product sales and extra website advertising.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    As for how much money the "semi-big" YouTubers make, Dave Jones of EEVBlog (700k subscribers) just posted:

    https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/y...72/#msg2903572
    Yeah I don't think the middle tier people are living large by any means. AFAIK LGR for example still lives in an 800sqft house, and I haven't heard him boasting of any new sports cars. And he has storage space rented and all that. $80k usd isn't bad considering what the gig is, but it is a lot of work to do it for real, and yeah, you could make more doing other things. Only guys making serious money are guys like Pewdiepie or Linus, but I'm pretty sure most of their revenue comes from other activities and products.

  10. #70
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    So I was encouraged by a lot of positive comments I got about the OSI 300 video I did (admittedly a dry subject) and decided to make a minimal investment just to fix my chronic photo lighting problems. I didn't just do this for Youtube purposes -- it has always driven me nuts that I couldn't get good quality photos of my machines. That was probably the larger reason. So I bought one of those $100 kits with a bunch of softboxes, umbrella lights and a green screen. The kids and I had a blast with it on the weekend (they had our ferret visit Paris and eat ice cream). It's pretty fun. Honestly I don't even care about the Youtube stuff anymore, there's just a lot of creative opportunities with this gear that I would have loved to have been able to do as a kid and can actually do now.

    Anyway I did a short test run, just to see what it'd look like. I'm very impressed by the improvement in lighting with the softboxes! Also really impressed with the quality the Samsung Note 10's little camera can pull off when you get the conditions right. I do need to iron the greenscreen out (it was shipped folded) and figure out more of the lighting, but yeah, this is really fun to play with (except when I unsuspectingly opened the round light reflector thing and discovered it was spring loaded to open up to 5 times its size.. right in my face). I'm a big fan of 'how it's done' videos, so hands on learning is up my alley. I'm going to have some fun with this and push the boundaries of what I can do a bit more.

    greenscreen.png 20200214_203852.jpg
    Last edited by falter; February 19th, 2020 at 10:01 AM.

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