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Thread: Most "accessible" CP/M Machine

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Just pointing out that while I haven't run CP/M on "real" hardware in years, I routinely run CP/M programs on modern hardware. Works the same, only faster and less fidgety. My S100 systems have been collecting dust for at least 30 years.

    I used to have much the same discussion with my late father. He briefly had a thing for old (1920s) radios that he enjoyed during his youth. My point to him, that he grudginly conceded, was there was little practical difference in the result of using an old Atwater-Kent or a Sony transistor (this was a long time ago); the message was the same. No AM radio station back in the 1970s was still playing the A&P Gypsies. Might as well get rid of the necessity of A and B batteries of the A-K and enjoy the better sound of the Sony.
    A little before my time . . . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyRjnZQdG4w

    But a battery powered crystal controlled superhet was still a great cub scout project back on '50-'51.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  2. #12

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    TRS80 Model IV is a great machine but it’s keyboard isn’t the best. Kaypro seems like a good choice but the screen might be a bit small.

    What about a Superbrain QD? Are they more plentiful in the US? It has a cracking keyboard, crystal clear display and of course looks like a “proper” computer..

  3. #13

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    so we've got three votes for the TRS-80 Mk4 - do the internal CRTs on those guys tend to hold up pretty well?

    Would I be able to write disks for it on my normal 40 track 360kB 5.25" drives with IMD?

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by JonB View Post
    TRS80 Model IV is a great machine but it’s keyboard isn’t the best. Kaypro seems like a good choice but the screen might be a bit small.

    What about a Superbrain QD? Are they more plentiful in the US? It has a cracking keyboard, crystal clear display and of course looks like a “proper” computer..
    I think the superbrain is rare everywhere, and $$$$$$$$$$$

  5. #15
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    For the all-in-one chassis, I was partial to the Heath/Zenith H/Z89. It had a keyboard able to survive a lot of use.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    A little before my time . . . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyRjnZQdG4w

    But a battery powered crystal controlled superhet was still a great cub scout project back on '50-'51.
    I've been in similar disagreements with classical musicians who go for the "authentic" performance, using period instruments (or replications thereof). "That's nice and interesting but if you want to recreate the period experience, you'll fail every time. People don't hear the same way they did in 1700--and there's nothing you can do about that."

    That being said, there are probably still a few P112 projects kicking around.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I've been in similar disagreements with classical musicians who go for the "authentic" performance, using period instruments (or replications thereof). "That's nice and interesting but if you want to recreate the period experience, you'll fail every time. People don't hear the same way they did in 1700--and there's nothing you can do about that."

    That being said, there are probably still a few P112 projects kicking around.
    In my opinion it's a pointless discussion to have. If we were trying to use CP/M software for some practical purpose that would be a completely different matter, but since we're talking about a hobby activity that we partake in strictly for pleasure, the correct answer is really whatever feels right to the user.

  8. #18
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    Just going by the OP:

    I was thinking about getting him some vintage hardware to experience the OS on for Christmas, but I don't really know where to start.
    Personally, if you want a capable CLI-oriented OS, I'd opt for MS-DOS. Easy to find support for with a wide base of applications. At least in early versions, not much different from CP/M. Heck, in MS-DOS you can still do CP/M-80 system calls; i.e.

    Code:
            mov     cl,function
            call       far ds:0005    ; assumes DS->PSP segment
    If you want to go really primitive, try one of the little PDP8 clones.

  9. #19
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    Bill (WSM)’s MinZ systems are super slick and tiny, well worth considering. The Z80-MBC2 and Zeta2 are also others you should look into.
    If you want the full S100 experience look at www.s100computers.com

    - Gary

  10. #20

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    Maybe I should hold off for Christmas and build one of the kits... Might wait until his birthday or something

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