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Thread: PS/2 Floppy Repair

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    I use a piece of tape, cut in a small strip, to tack the chip down while soldering the ends. After soldered, I remove the strip. Use separate rosin flux so you don't have to depend on the solders flux. Also, use small diameter solder. If you don't have any small diameter, use your cutters to cut a small strip, length wise.
    I'm 72 and can't see anything closer than a foot and a half without glasses, so I suspect anyone could do it.
    Dwight
    I would try it myself but my hands are so shaky I can't do anything much smaller than a barrel battery

  2. #12
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    I repair them. Mostly it's bad caps. Sometimes the leakage damage is too extensive, I'm not sure what happens but the symptom is that the drive won't spin up. If your drive still spins up, it can probably be saved.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    I repair them. Mostly it's bad caps. Sometimes the leakage damage is too extensive, I'm not sure what happens but the symptom is that the drive won't spin up. If your drive still spins up, it can probably be saved.
    I think I've got like 5 drives now, the 3 I've tried spin up and seek but can't read anything. The one in my model 35 worked perfectly until a month ago so I know that one can definitely be saved

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by RadRacer203 View Post
    The one in my model 35 worked perfectly until a month ago so I know that one can definitely be saved
    Actually, there's no real reason to assume that.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    I repair them. Mostly it's bad caps. Sometimes the leakage damage is too extensive, I'm not sure what happens but the symptom is that the drive won't spin up. If your drive still spins up, it can probably be saved.
    When you say this, do you mean drives that load down the power supply or drives that only don't work. Most capacitor failures that I've seen are on the power rails. I've seen a few else where but not so many that I can count them.
    Dwight

  6. #16
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    Heads can get damaged too.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    When you say this, do you mean drives that load down the power supply or drives that only don't work. Most capacitor failures that I've seen are on the power rails. I've seen a few else where but not so many that I can count them.
    Dwight
    The caps are in both the power supply and signal sections. There's three nonpolar electrolytics in the motor control section. They don't drag the supply down when they fail, I suspect they just lose capacitance or the ESR gets really bad. On two of the drives that wouldn't spin up, I've pulled the motor control chip and found corrosion/goop under it, cleaning it up didn't fix the issue.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    The caps are in both the power supply and signal sections. There's three nonpolar electrolytics in the motor control section. They don't drag the supply down when they fail, I suspect they just lose capacitance or the ESR gets really bad. On two of the drives that wouldn't spin up, I've pulled the motor control chip and found corrosion/goop under it, cleaning it up didn't fix the issue.
    So, it is still the juicy ones or the tantalums. Not just all of the capacitors. I generally don't look at the others. The newer surface mount ceramics seem to fail a lot, almost as much as tantalums. I agree, old electrolytics are a common source of problems. Some like to replace tantalums with electrolytics. I'm not a fan of doing that. Often the circuit will work fine without the tantalums in place as it is just extra insurance that the noise is not an issue. I do hate it when electrolytics leak. It is just a mess.
    Dwight

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    I repair them. Mostly it's bad caps. Sometimes the leakage damage is too extensive, I'm not sure what happens but the symptom is that the drive won't spin up. If your drive still spins up, it can probably be saved.
    How much would you charge to recap a drive? The one that's kind of critical is the one in my model 35, the other 4 I have are just spares at the moment

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by RadRacer203 View Post
    The one that's kind of critical is the one in my model 35, the other 4 I have are just spares at the moment
    They're not spares if they don't work.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

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