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Thread: What is this? A Commodore cable?

  1. #1
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    Default What is this? A Commodore cable?

    Could anyone advise as to what this cable is?

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  2. #2

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    A parallel printer adapter for the C64 or VIC-20.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    A parallel printer adapter for the C64 or VIC-20.
    Ah, I knew it looked familiar... now it makes sense. Thank you!

    I'm assuming this is homemade? Were these actually sold?

  4. #4

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    Looks like a commercially made one with the label fallen off.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    Looks like a commercially made one with the label fallen off.
    Of course, back then, the difference between 'commercial' and 'homemade' weren't far removed. I have one that's even jankier than this, but at least the 'manufacturer' printed the info directly onto the case.
    -- Brian

    Systems: Amstad PCW 8256, Apple IIe/II+/GS/Mac+/Mac 512k, Atari 800/520STFM, Commodore 64/128/Amiga 3000/PET 4032/SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Osborne 1, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, Timex Sinclair 1000, TRS-80 Color Computer 3/Model 4 GA

  6. #6

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    Question: could you open the case so we could have a look inside, please? With these printer cartridges I'm always interested in what hardware they use.

    I had some of these cartridges and IIRC they used the +5V supplied by the printer. Funny to see one where you have to tap it from the cassette port.
    With kind regards / met vriendelijke groet, Ruud Baltissen

    www.baltissen.org

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruud View Post
    I had some of these cartridges and IIRC they used the +5V supplied by the printer. Funny to see one where you have to tap it from the cassette port.
    So i have two myself, one is broken but was a grappler type... both of them pull power from the cassette port which was common for commodore accessories. Super sketchy, but you could get away with things like that back then, and power supplies were much more expensive to make, so likely just a way to keep costs down.
    -- Brian

    Systems: Amstad PCW 8256, Apple IIe/II+/GS/Mac+/Mac 512k, Atari 800/520STFM, Commodore 64/128/Amiga 3000/PET 4032/SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Osborne 1, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, Timex Sinclair 1000, TRS-80 Color Computer 3/Model 4 GA

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruud View Post
    Question: could you open the case so we could have a look inside, please? With these printer cartridges I'm always interested in what hardware they use.

    I had some of these cartridges and IIRC they used the +5V supplied by the printer. Funny to see one where you have to tap it from the cassette port.
    Here you go!

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    IMG_1488.jpg

  9. #9
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    It's a Xetex Super Graphix Jr case without the cutout for the dip switches. I wonder if another company made it and put their own sticker on it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruud View Post
    I had some of these cartridges and IIRC they used the +5V supplied by the printer. Funny to see one where you have to tap it from the cassette port.
    That's how *all* of them were powered, at least initially. The original Centronics 36-pin spec doesnt include a +5VDC line for power. I'm not sure who was first, but at some later date manufacturers started adding the +5V line and it became sort of a de-facto standard as others followed suit.

    All of the popular CardCo interfaces used cassette port power. Some designs had the connector, but featured a board jumper to select printer cable or cassette power.
    Last edited by WimWalther; January 21st, 2020 at 08:08 AM.
    Auf wiedersehen, schweinhund!

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