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Thread: "The Decade Tech Lost Its Way"

  1. #1
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    Default "The Decade Tech Lost Its Way"

    Title of a New York Times business special section

    I was trying to think of anything technically exciting about the 2010's, and I couldn't think of anything.

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    Welcome to the world of consumer appliances.

    It had to happen sooner or later. There's a modicum of interest in quantum computing, but even that isn't strictly 2010s.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Kossow View Post
    I was trying to think of anything technically exciting about the 2010's, and I couldn't think of anything.
    The kind of imaging tech (both hardware and software) available to consumers was extremely exciting in the past decade. For less than $500 you can shoot 4k60 content, something unthinkable in 2010 at that price point.
    Offering a bounty for:
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    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

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    But how is this significant? It's a refinement, but I'm not sure that the consumer market was really pining for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Kossow View Post
    Title of a New York Times business special section

    I was trying to think of anything technically exciting about the 2010's, and I couldn't think of anything.
    What was technically exciting about the 2000s or the 2010s ?

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    Thought some more about this, and I had forgotten about the huge improvement in hobbyist tools this decade, the proliferation of FPGA designs, cheap Chinese test equipment and pcb fabs, KICAD, MFM disk emulators.
    A decade ago, I wouldn't have been able to afford a 16-channel 10MHz analog data acquisition system with 100gb of SDRAM which let me digitize mag tape.

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    3D printing for that matter. Ten years ago it was still a mix of ultra-expensive resin and powder printing machines for prototypes with the first of the ABS/PLA filament systems coming online in hobbyist hands through a LOT of hacking and still rather low resolution and slow speeds. Same with laser cutters. You can now buy a 4' x 4' bed with a CO2 laser tube for under $6000. The arduino and its IDE have SIGNIFICANTLY improved the learning curve for learning microcontrollers. When I was still in highschool your options was the PIC16....or the BASIC stamp.

    For consumers I've been amazed how far Virtual Reality has gone since the kickstarter for the Oculus Rift. I can't even recall any products from the 2000's that attracted anywhere near as much momentum. Now mind you many of these projects are now splintering off as the meddling persists (facebook's purchase Oculus and more recently their requirement to have a facebook account to access portions of the product) but there is still plenty of momentum that is allowing the popularity to continue as the price continues to fall for what was formerly $1500 base price for the hardware.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    But how is this significant? It's a refinement, but I'm not sure that the consumer market was really pining for it.
    It's changed the way we produce and consume moving images. Prior to 2010, cell phone video wasn't really viable. The quality we carry around with us can now capture any event in reference quality (whether or not that content is viewable outside of an oppressive government's network is another topic). Even car dash cams have caught some amazing stuff, like the multiple angles of the Chelyabinsk meteor exploding.
    Offering a bounty for:
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    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

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    For some perhaps. I'm not one of those who spends my waking hours watching bad phone videos on TBD or YT.

    Wrong age I guess. I prefer to listen to the TV rather than waste resources watching it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pcdosretro View Post
    What was technically exciting about the 2000s or the 2010s ?
    For the 2000s, there was all the fun involving Rambus and Intel catching the same malaise that afflicted TI back in the 80s. It was exciting but for all the wrong reasons.

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