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Thread: RAM chips in my Tandy 1000 TX

  1. #11

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    Interesting discussion, but I think upgrading all the ram to 120ns certainly can't hurt. I may just give it a try and we are not talking a huge amount of money. I think about $30 would cover everything.

  2. #12
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    Just remember the cheap wipe sockets on the motherboard are only good for so many insertion cycles.

    (Again, unless you're actually seeing some bad behavior it's not going to do anything.)
    My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs

  3. #13

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    I am seeing some unusual behavior and that is why I am going to replace all the memory. The system has not been 100% stable. I think it's worth a shot at this point.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eudimorphodon View Post
    Just remember, the OP's TX already has a 286 so a V20 isn't really on the table.
    I guess I didn't catch that (don't have a TX myself)... good point.

    Looks like we're done here anyway.
    -- Brian

    Systems: Amstad PCW 8256, Apple IIe/II+/GS/Mac+/Mac 512k, Atari 800/520STFM, Commodore 64/128/Amiga 3000/PET 4032/SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Osborne 1, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, Timex Sinclair 1000, TRS-80 Color Computer 3/Model 4 GA

  5. #15

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    I swapped all the 150ns memory for 120ns. The instability issues I was having are now gone. Total cost was around $30 for 16 120ns 256kx1 and 4 64kx4 chips. Well worth the time and effort

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasa1063 View Post
    I swapped all the 150ns memory for 120ns. The instability issues I was having are now gone. Total cost was around $30 for 16 120ns 256kx1 and 4 64kx4 chips. Well worth the time and effort
    Well, slap Leisure Suit Larry in that thing and see how it goes.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  7. #17
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    Might be worth running a few loops of the "hard" version of the memory test in Checkit! 3 to make sure all's well.
    My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs

  8. #18

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    I ran the extensive memory test with Checkit 3 a few times after I installed the ram. All tests passed!

  9. #19
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    Excellent!

    I still doubt the speed of the old ram *per se* was the problem, it was probably fine when the machine was new. But getting old happens to all of us; I've run into bad RAM a few times over the years. (Most recently on an Apple IIgs of about the same vintage as your TX.)
    My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs

  10. #20

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    When I got the computer off of eBay and opened it up, the metal frame was bent and warped in a few places. I was able to straighten everything out, but obviously it has sustained some damage sometime during it's life. Some of the RAM chips were probably on the receiving end of that damage.

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