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Thread: Were cooler running systems better off during the capacitor plague era?

  1. #1

    Default Were cooler running systems better off during the capacitor plague era?

    Were systems configured with higher TDP CPUs more prone to bad caps than cooler running CPU based systems? Take a 43W PII 300MHz Klamath core vs a 16.8W 266MHz Deschutes model, for example.

    Also, how much did having better quality fans and case airflow make in a system with a bad cap era motherboard?

  2. #2
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    The Pentium II was several years before bad caps started to become an issue. I don't think I've ever seen a Pentium II or early Pentium III motherboard with bad capacitors, it wasn't until around 2000/2001 bad caps started showing up in numbers.

    Heat will definitely exacerbate defective capacitor failure rates.

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    PII was produced through 2001 for the desktop variety--and I've seen bad caps in later motherboards, particularly the ones that were labeled for PII or PIII Slot 1.

    But by far, the worst abuses weren't in motherboards at all--it was LCD monitors with integrated PSUs (external PSU designs fared a bit better). You'd see electrolytics hot-glued to heat sinks, no kidding. I have one old LCD monitor here were the design was so bad, that I depopulated the inverter section of the PCB and replaced it with a generic inverter. Still have the display and it still works.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the information. I'll watch out for Katmai era boards.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    But by far, the worst abuses weren't in motherboards at all--it was LCD monitors with integrated PSUs (external PSU designs fared a bit better). You'd see electrolytics hot-glued to heat sinks, no kidding. I have one old LCD monitor here were the design was so bad, that I depopulated the inverter section of the PCB and replaced it with a generic inverter. Still have the display and it still works.
    I've had to gut and retrofit my own rolled power supply solutions for several LCD monitors due to bad caps taking out the power board. My most recent was an I-INC 28" LCD monitor, the power board was completely cooked from end to end due to failed caps. The supply was too damaged to repair and too expensive to replace, a replacement being something like $90 and I only paid $20 for the monitor. There also was no guarantee the replacement would stay working since it was from the same vintage of the monitor, and would require an additional investment of preemptively recapping it.

    My own rolled solution was to get a 300W Chinese 3D printer power supply, a 10A boost converter and a 15A buck converter to make all of the required voltage rails (24v for the backlight, 12v and 5v for the signal board.) I got a piece of protoboard and desoldered the connectors from the original power supply and installed them on it and routed the power rails where they needed to go. The monitor works fine now, albeit with a fat power brick mounted to the rear of the unit since it wouldn't fit inside. This was about $40 in parts and a few hours of my time.

    I did an LCD TV awhile back the same way, but I used a dremel to cut down the original power board to just the connectors since there was some extra wires going between the signal board and backlight inverter.

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