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Thread: overclocking

  1. #11
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    Ok watched most of the video again. It was an i3-6100te, twice the narrator says i5, base clock 2.7ghz, and he gets it up to nearly 4.2. The chip is very low wattage, 35tdp, before ocing. He states in the beginning of the video it's not a great overclocker 8O! 50% sounds huge to me.

    Ok, had to investigate this one. An i3-6100 ships at 3.7ghz (and 51 watt tdp). He even states the chip in the video is an engineering sample. So apparently Intel had to overclock it before they shipped. So actual increase I reckon was only 13.5%.
    Last edited by tipc; January 12th, 2020 at 06:45 PM.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    Ok watched most of the video again. It was an i3-6100te, twice the narrator says i5, base clock 2.7ghz, and he gets it up to nearly 4.2. The chip is very low wattage, 35tdp, before ocing. He states in the beginning of the video it's not a great overclocker 8O! 50% sounds huge to me.

    Ok, had to investigate this one. An i3-6100 ships at 3.7ghz (and 51 watt tdp). He even states the chip in the video is an engineering sample. So apparently Intel had to overclock it before they shipped. So actual increase I reckon was only 13.5%.
    There is both a i3-6100 and a i3-6100te. The 6100te uses about 2/3 the power of the 6100. https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us...-2-70-ghz.html

    Overclocking one of the artificially constrained low power variants of a chip does not seem like all that impressive an achievement. Unless it was a bad chip, it should be able to run at the same speed as the standard model if the cooling is adequate.

  3. #13
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    YMMV on lower clocked CPUs. They can either be binned because they can't reach a specific clock, or binned because that part is selling numbers and there aren't enough "defective enough" parts to meet that demand and normal chips are binned to that speed.

    The Core 2 architecture was really the last that was easily overclockable. Intel has cracked down on overclocking and made it exceedingly difficult on non-K parts. Bclk overclocking is really the only option available on Core i series parts with locked multipliers, and since everything is tied to Bclk, it makes it a difficult task to get any high overclocks.

  4. #14

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    Intel sells all range of designs for almost every ix number. I don't consider that to be a current design just because it says i5 They have been making i5s for quite some time.
    Dwight

  5. #15
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    Overclocking potential depends on 4 things

    Chip design: Will a higher clock speed or FSB actually make a difference in real world speed.
    Manufacturing Process: Are the chips being made binning closer to the top end, middle , or bottom end.
    Motherboards: Will it allow you to tweek the voltages, FSB, RAM etc to get the most out of what you have.
    Luck: Did you get a good CPU or a bad one off the line.

    People love to OC core chips because Intel manufacturing process at the time was cranking out great chips with a lot of headroom at stock voltages and quite a bit with overvolting (depending on the design).
    I have a few overclocked Phenom II and AMD FX chips in the collection because they were fun to play with but even with a decent overclock it didn't matter that much in games.

    I can see taking a mid grade chip and OC it to high end to save money if you have the skill and you purchased a lucky chip. Once you factor in the OC motherboard, special spec RAM, extra cooler the costs and results are probably not worth it.

    You need a major speed upgrade to notice the difference in real world tests which you rarely get in OC and these days most of the speed you get in gaming is from the GPU anyway.
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  6. #16
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    I started with overclocking AMD Athlon 64's then moved onto Intel Core 2 Duos.

    It was pretty much a game of who could overclock the furthest without getting a Blue Screen of Death.

    We didn't spend much, except on an upgraded cooler.

    At the end of the day it wasn't really worth it on the C2D's though the Athlon 64's did result in a noticeable improvement gain.

    It was fun and good to learn about the hardware.

  7. #17
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    I learned a good lesson years ago--never buy used memory or CPUs from an overclocking gamer. Fortunately, I didn't spend much on them (local buy), but the DDR memory turned out to be warm-flaky and the CPU exhibited all sorts of random failures.

  8. #18
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    Over clocking with higher voltage just causes the normal atom migration in CPUs to speed up. All CPUs will eventually burn out because of that.

    Somebody who knows what they are doing (not going nuts with over voltaging and using either water cooling or a huge fan with 4 or more heatpipes in a well ventilated case) will probably not harm them much especially since those types only run them for a year or two and upgrade. You get much more damage running a CPU at normal speed with a clogged up fan in a hot house with dust over everything.

    The last 2 laptops I got in one had a seized fan and the other had the copper heatsink the fan blows into 100% clogged. Both of those laptops would have overheated with any serious use. Fortunately cleaning and lubing the fans and removing the dust is fairly easy and I replaced the Celeron (which runs at full speed all the time) with a faster Pentium M with Speedstep so it runs cooler.
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