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Thread: overclocking

  1. #1
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    Default overclocking

    Do you stand to learn a lot about mobo/cpu technicalities of a general sort by investing in overclockable hardware? It's come to my attention that SuperO was the company that developed non-K overclocking. I'm looking at some of their consumer boards, always admired their products anyway, and thought some present mysteriousness could be dispelled by delving into this shadowy realm. I peruse some of these server type boards, and I can glean some meanings from posts. But at the end of the day I'm just an idiot.

    Some SuperO boards from 4 - 5 years ago were said to have a dizzying number of parameters to play with in the bios. Would say a much more recent overclockable Asus board have that much functionality? I buy too much crap and don't want to spend too much on older hardware, especially when it isn't much less then something recent. But the learning ...

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    Do you stand to learn a lot about mobo/cpu technicalities of a general sort by investing in overclockable hardware? It's come to my attention that SuperO was the company that developed non-K overclocking. I'm looking at some of their consumer boards, always admired their products anyway, and thought some present mysteriousness could be dispelled by delving into this shadowy realm. I peruse some of these server type boards, and I can glean some meanings from posts. But at the end of the day I'm just an idiot.

    Some SuperO boards from 4 - 5 years ago were said to have a dizzying number of parameters to play with in the bios. Would say a much more recent overclockable Asus board have that much functionality? I buy too much crap and don't want to spend too much on older hardware, especially when it isn't much less then something recent. But the learning ...
    Kind of tough to respond. SuperO boards tend to be pricey and some say their BIOS's are problematic. Overclocking today isn't what it used to be. Today's top hardware technology clearly exceeds the offerings of most consumer software. Overclocking an Anthlon or Pentium used to have a cult following (still does) but not so much with the newer stuff. My last two builds were an Asus Z170 with an I7-6700, and more recently, an Asus X570 with Ryzen 5 3600. Both of those builds have the ability to OC through the manufacturers' own software utilities. Basically, if you're a gamer and have a good video card along with one of the big 3 boards; i.e., Asus, Gigabyte, and MSI, for example, OC'ing is hardly in the equation anymore, as it's done for you. You'll be more concerned with your cooling, video and audio. Also, tweaking your memory is now a big part of the game. You may want to check-in over at Overclocking.net and see what's going on with the SuperO crowd.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

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    In fact one of the boards I was looking at had tbe z170. I noticed you said i7 6700, but not 6700k. I don't know offhand if both chips exist. But at least on a non SM board, you have to have a k chip (or x?) to overclock. It's not so much that I have a burning need to overclock, absolutely no pun intended. But being with some older boards at least you have the ability to play with so much via the bios, it seems you stand to learn whatever can be learned about this stuff. And I don't mean just what's specific to ocing.

    Yes I guess I have to join one of those boards to see what I can see. There's really only so much you can learn, I don't see anyone working miracles out there.

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    Yes - mine is a k.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    I noticed you said i7 6700, but not 6700k. I don't know offhand if both chips exist
    Yes, there is a 6700 and 6700k. The former has locked multipliers and has a base clock of 3.4 GHz, while the latter has unlocked multipliers and has a base clock of 4 GHz. The 6700k is a better chip even if you don't overclock.

    Though, there's no sense in getting either chip when you can get the Ryzen 7 2700x for between $150 and $200, which has double the cores and threads.

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    Having decided I wanted to (again) dabble in pc building after a very long time, my inclination was to go with AMD. Times change, and although a smidgeon of an interest in AMD has blossomed in my bosom (???), I'm too much of a fanboy to lavish my interest on anything but Intel stuff. I'm starting to learn a few new things, things I may not have learned or wouldn't be as relevant in an AMD only world. All of AMD's processors are unlocked. As I mentioned Supermicro hacked the uefi and made it possible to oc chips that o/w couldn't. This intrigues me.

  7. #7

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    It used to be that the processors always had what was called significant head room. This means they'd always have a relatively large safety band of clocking speed that ensured that the part would work in all conditions.
    Things have changed. The chips now days have less head room. This is because they have gotten better at knowing where their limits are. They monitor things like the voltage, temperature and the amount of loads themselves. We now have what is called boost clocks. This is were the chip knows it is safe to increase it speed.
    There is less head room for the over clocking. The chips are better at milking that last bit of speed them selves.
    Of course, one can take them out of normal operating range by cooling and over voltages to squeeze a little more out. Just don't expect to see the large gains that there once was.
    Dwight

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    It seems with some chips you can bump the clockspeed 50%.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    It seems with some chips you can bump the clockspeed 50%.
    I'm not talking about the AMD 1600 chip.
    Dwight

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    I watched something last night. I'll watch it again later. IINM it was a i5 from a few years ago that had a 2.8ghz stock clock. On a SM board he bumped it up to 4.2ghz. And it wasn't a -k chip. Like I said I'll look at the video again to be sure. Maybe it was a 3.2ghz chip

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