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Thread: Intel SDK-86

  1. #1
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    Default Intel SDK-86

    Anyone familiar with it? Anyone have one? I was curious of the possibility of cloning it. They're not terribly uncommon. The last one went for ~118$. Not horrible but I buy more then I should as it is. It has utility for tjose looking to dabble in machine code. I personally don't see the need for such an appurtenance, I learned assembler from a book (a good one). But it would still be neat to see it cloned and running.

  2. #2

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    There was one chip on the board, related to bus management, but I forget what is was, that is not available any more. I recall that when the board first came out, there was a bug in this chip ( timing? ). To work right, one needed the newer version of the chip. In any case, it was a special Intel chip. As far as I know it was only available on the later version of these kits.
    One would have to recreate the later version of this chip with a programmable chip of some type.
    There were simpler devices made later. Someplace in my piles, I have a small board made by AMD that has a 80188 and a flash ROM with a large RAM. The 80186/8 used 8086 code but contained the interrupt controller on the chip with a few other things to make it a single chip, like the 8051, for embedded use. It usually had a dedicated serial interface as well, making it so one could talk to it.
    Any way, it was a smaller board that could be used to develop working 8086 code on. The SDK-86 was the first experimenters board though, made by Intel.
    Dwight

  3. #3
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    I have three Intel SDK-86 boards and documentation. More info here: https://sites.google.com/site/tingox/intel_sdk-86
    The documentation (including monitor listings) is available on Bitsavers.
    I haven't done anything with the SDK-86 - yet.
    Torfinn

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    The 80188/86 is more interesting to me. I had an Intel rvaluation board years ago that I sold for some strange reason. The thing about the SDK-86 is at least a few texts are based on it.

    There's even an 8086? based trainer available from china these days. It's about 150$ which seems like a lot to me. I personally don't believe trainers are necessary. It makes just as much sense to learn machine principles with an assembler and a keyboard.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    The 80188/86 is more interesting to me. I had an Intel rvaluation board years ago that I sold for some strange reason. The thing about the SDK-86 is at least a few texts are based on it.

    There's even an 8086? based trainer available from china these days. It's about 150$ which seems like a lot to me. I personally don't believe trainers are necessary. It makes just as much sense to learn machine principles with an assembler and a keyboard.
    I've written a version of Forth ( I don't recall which Forth I based it on ) to run on the 80C188 board. It was one that I originally wrote to be on a 80C186 board I got with GPS. I used it to log GPS signals over time. It was interesting. I saw two types of errors. One was kind of circular but another was like a line. I always thought the circular one was the dithering that they were suppose to do and the other was more likely a math error in the GPS receiver ( most working in integer math suffer from someone's idea that it should round towards zero. This causes similar errors when doing extended math. Look up floored math to avoid this error ).
    These were intended for some type of monitor for commercial trucks. It had several RS232 ports. I believe I bought a couple of these and they all had at least one blown RS232 ports ( not a good design to use in a truck ).

    When I picked up the 80C188 board, I just copied the binary to it and it worked fine.
    Dwight

  6. #6
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    The system development boards from Intel have alot of resources on the web if you start to dig. While I was doing just that for a board I picked up, I found this website where the fellow has recreated numerous board layouts and posted the information online. Any of these could turn into a really fun project...

    https://intel-vintage.info/projects.htm

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    I think I have a rom based FORTH for an 80188 robot brain. I need to inspect those images I was sent (and build that darn board).

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    The board I had was pretty small as I recall. Bigger then an Ampro but not a lot. I want to say it had an 80186. Pretty sure. But some spurious notion tells me it may have been an 80c186.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    I think I have a rom based FORTH for an 80188 robot brain. I need to inspect those images I was sent (and build that darn board).
    Forth makes a great monitor. It is a little large compared to most monitors but gives abilities that you are not likely to find in most monitors.
    Dwight

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