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Thread: Linux for M68K

  1. #21
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    ivelegacy, is all of your LC475 work on line somewhere?

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmo View Post
    I've read some of KISS030 development log and watched a few videos. The striking impression was how much memory it needed (128meg or more) and how slow it executed. I can revisit the older NetBSD and see whether the software bloats can be removed, but that requires more knowledge of NetBSD than I have.
    I mean, it's a modern *nix, so you are gonna get some bloat. Still, I'm running a relatively current version on my MicroVAX 3100/90 and, while it's no speed demon, it's entirely usable. What were they trying to run on it?
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  3. #23
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    Back around 1983 or so, there were several equipment vendors (e.g. Plexus) who were selling 68K-equipped systems running Unix SsysV as minicomputer replacements. So, unless you're doing a lot of graphics, it's not unreasonably slow.

    Exempli gratia

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmo View Post
    So how much RAM you've installed in LC475 to make Linux work?
    The soldered RAM on the LC475 motherboard is 4MB; Apple only officially supported up to 36 MB of RAM by installing a single 32 MB SIMM. However, third-parties have been able to upgrade it to 132 MB by installing a single 128 MB SIMM.

    I have never tried that, just a 32MB stick, for a total of 4+32=36Mbyte of RAM (probably, a 64MB stick is better, if you have it).

    The kernel 2.6.26 takes 10Mbyte for its internal structures and tasks, hence 26Mbyte is the RAM for the userland. Anyway, Kernels 4.* eat more RAM, and the kernel itself is bigger.

    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmo View Post
    I think there is a socket that translate the 5V 68040 signals to 3.3V 68060. Maybe that is the "smartsocket" you talked about.
    Yup. There was a commercial adapter, made for Amiga/68k I guess. RS-components had it in their catalog, and it was extremely expensive (> 300 Euro). I found one in a person-to-person Amiga's marketplace. Paid something like 70 Euro.

    Adapting a 68060 CPU to the 68040's socket has several problems, that require voltage level shifting, PLL/clock because the 040 processor is "clock doubled", whereas the 060 is not, and some glue-logic on the 060's extra lines to inhibit its burst-cycles.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by commodorejohn View Post
    I mean, it's a modern *nix, so you are gonna get some bloat. Still, I'm running a relatively current version on my MicroVAX 3100/90 and, while it's no speed demon, it's entirely usable. What were they trying to run on it?
    Though, now that I think about it, the comparison is probably less equivalent than I figured off-the-cuff here - not so much for the difference in clock speed, but because the MicroVAX has A. a more substantial on-die cache, and B. a decent L2 cache. The 68030 has only dual 512-byte I&D caches, and I've never seen a 68k design with any L2 cache outside of vintage *nix workstations. So that's probably a significant factor, especially for modern code run through a modern compiler that isn't particularly conscious of code-size limitations.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by commodorejohn View Post
    I've never seen a 68k design with any L2 cache outside of vintage *nix workstations.
    Daystar 50MHz CPU upgrades for the IIci had a cache (and the IIfx of course)
    The Daystar makes a ci a pretty snappy machine.
    daystar.JPG

  7. #27

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    Ah, right, I forgot about the IIfx.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Kossow View Post
    Daystar 50MHz CPU upgrades for the IIci had a cache (and the IIfx of course)
    The Daystar makes a ci a pretty snappy machine.
    daystar.JPG
    I ran my NetBSD IIci with a Daystar for awhile (and a modified kernel to turn on the cache), but I moved that to the MacIvory and the IIci still seems to run NetBSD just fine with the 32K L1 card. It's still going strong.
    I use my C128 because I am an ornery, stubborn, retro grouch. -- Bob Masse
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  9. #29

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    It's been a few years, but I ran NetBSD on my Mac SE/30. IIRC it was the most capable *nix for the SE/30 back then, and it probably still is today (although my own SE/30 has long since broken down). I remember that I had to boot into System 7 and then start NetBSD from there (it took over the system then, just couldn't boot directly).

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Plasmo View Post
    I've developed a 68030 homebrew. I'm interested in porting Linux for M68K.
    Hi Bill,

    There are so many SBC running linux, why not try Microware OS-9?

    Marc
    All documents about the 68K family that I found: http://marc.retronik.fr/motorola/68K
    French magazines and documentation: www.retronik.fr

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