Image Map Image Map
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: Underrated CPUs over the years

  1. #11

    Default

    x86 - Pentium M. Underrated from the standpoint of desktop use, where it was supported only by very few motherboards.

    non x86 - 68010. Several computer lines started with the 68000 after the 68010 was already available. Had they used the '010 instead it would have avoided a number of upwards compatibility headaches. And Human68K could have used the RTD instruction to return from DOS calls instead of making the caller clean up the stack...

  2. #12

    Default

    Or the 1802 ?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    33,437
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    In non-x86, I have a fondness for the old RISC chps: PA-RISC, i860, MIPS... Although I've never got to play with the MC88000, I suspect it was of the same family.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Western North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    1,255

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    In non-x86, I have a fondness for the old RISC chps: PA-RISC, i860, MIPS... Although I've never got to play with the MC88000, I suspect it was of the same family.
    Hey Chuck, thanks for the reminder.... I had forgotten the fantastic performance at an equally fantastic price Apollo PRISM. Only ever used in the Apollo DN10000, which could have up to four of them, each with a substantial fraction of the performance of a Cray 1. VLIW in 1988, 12 years before Itanic^Hum. (Tongue in cheek, there, as I have a small SGI Altix here, 30 CPUs and 54GB of RAM, runnable, with CentOS 5.8 (my own rebuild from source) installed).
    --
    Thus spake Tandy Xenix System III version 3.2: "Bughlt: Sckmud Shut her down Scotty, she's sucking mud again!"

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    33,437
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    Yeah, it's sad that most of the mainline stuff has little variety in the ISA.

  6. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jasa1063 View Post
    Let me kick this off with the AMD K6 series of processors. I think most people looked at this CPU as just another Pentium compatible CPU that fit into a Socket 7 motherboard that made up a low cost system. The K6 had features that put in on par with the PII.
    Well, yes.

    A few days ago, I compared K6 to pentium, then said the K6-2/3 competed with P2, and perhaps low end P3. The issue is that the original K6 processor still was only really competition with the original pentium MMX, until they started coming out with the K6-2/3 revisions and higher clock speeds, and offering the 100MHz bus on socket 7. This made budget upgrades and systems based on AMD the choice for a while, since Intel abandoned socket 7.

    Arguably, the later K6 could have been strong competition for P2/3 if software was optimized for it. It didn't seem like that happened, so the only benefit really was the higher clock speeds on socket 7, and couldn't really catch Intel on that alone. At least not until Athlon

    But I do appreciate their design and effort, and pushing costs lower. I bought a K6-3 myself, and still have it

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    33,437
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    This is a bit of tongue-in-cheek, but my nomination for the chip that will likely die a-borning is the Parallax Propeller 2. It's taken a long time to get to production (not there yet) and other than a few YT videos that have been badly produced, I don't see much enthusiasm. Too little, too late, I think,.

  8. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by the3dfxdude View Post
    Well, yes.

    A few days ago, I compared K6 to pentium, then said the K6-2/3 competed with P2, and perhaps low end P3. The issue is that the original K6 processor still was only really competition with the original pentium MMX, until they started coming out with the K6-2/3 revisions and higher clock speeds, and offering the 100MHz bus on socket 7. This made budget upgrades and systems based on AMD the choice for a while, since Intel abandoned socket 7.

    Arguably, the later K6 could have been strong competition for P2/3 if software was optimized for it. It didn't seem like that happened, so the only benefit really was the higher clock speeds on socket 7, and couldn't really catch Intel on that alone. At least not until Athlon

    But I do appreciate their design and effort, and pushing costs lower. I bought a K6-3 myself, and still have it
    When the K6-2 came out, AMD hadn't yet entered the GPU market and wanted to show off the capabilities of their new chip. They wanted to team up with NVIDIA to write an optimized D3D driver for the RIVA 128 + K6-2. NVIDIA didn't have extra engineers to tackle the project, so a contractor was brought in: Bill Budge. All you Apple II people know who he is. It was a fun project due to all the personalities involved, but I don't remember it being significantly faster than the standard D3D driver.

  9. #19

    Default

    The second generation Celeron was very good in terms of bang for the buck if you fiddled with it although it had a bad reputation. I overclocked mine with water cooling AND it could run in a dual processor machine although that also took some hacking. With not a lot of investment, my "slot" machines performed about as well in real-world applications as Pentium II dual-processor machines for hundreds less as I recall. Over the years, it just hasn't been worth it to tweak these things anymore - or, maybe it's a matter of time vs money as you get older and have more of the latter and less of the former. EDIT: I should mention that this was the 2nd generation of the chip. The first really was a total POS.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Western North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    1,255

    Default

    The Coppermine and Tualatin Celerons were decent performers, but the one to have was the Celeron 300A. I wouldn't class it as underrated, because everyone knew the 300A was the bomb for overclocking. See https://hardforum.com/threads/legend...0-mhz.1854992/

    The 1.4GHz Tualatin Celeron was the fastest thing around for the 100MHz Socket 370, and was used by Powerleap for a slotket upgrade for 100MHz Slot 1. Although a 1.5GHz was rumored, and there's even a Wikipedia entry in the list of P6 Celerons.
    Last edited by lowen; January 26th, 2020 at 07:49 PM.
    --
    Thus spake Tandy Xenix System III version 3.2: "Bughlt: Sckmud Shut her down Scotty, she's sucking mud again!"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •