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Thread: Pentium 4 CPU hack

  1. #11

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    Hi you are answering the tool. that's ok. Good suggestion.
    My question was the method.
    I got it making one side after the other.
    THX you are great.
    RaLPH

  2. #12
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    Also, sight along each row of pins and look for any that aren't lined up exactly with the others in each row. When you get that figured out, then turn the chip 90 deg's and sight along the new rows and see if the pins line up in that direction. You should be able to quickly see which pins are the problem pins.
    Crazy old guy with a basement full of Pentium 1 laptops and parts

  3. #13
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    I cut the damaged pins off. The CPU loses a few commands of the instruction set but as long as 99% of it is still there it works decently well and the kernel panics don't bother me that much.

    Just be careful, you don't want to cut the pins that are responsible for commands like MOV.


  4. #14
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    That's an interesting theory--or you're trolling.

  5. #15

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    I've always just used a flat bladed screwdriver, but I like the mechanical pencil idea

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    That's an interesting theory--or you're trolling.
    Try it!



    Removing a pin from underneath a CPU would undoubtedly destroy it. Most of those pins are bus pins and if you damage one of them then any address you send/receive is lacking a bit, hence rendering it all useless. And if it isn't a bus pin then probably a flag pin. Anyways, every pin is important except for a few but who knows which ones they are without going deep into CPU documentation.

    If you want to try to repair it (at your own risk), remove the pin as close to the CPU board as you can, sand the pad and the pin itself a bit, apply a very tiny amount of solder on both, and on the lowest temperature setting try to fuse them both without adding more solder. This is risky but the most logical way I can think of taking a dab at it.
    Last edited by chedro; February 4th, 2020 at 10:09 AM.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeltaDon View Post
    Also, sight along each row of pins and look for any that aren't lined up exactly with the others in each row. When you get that figured out, then turn the chip 90 deg's and sight along the new rows and see if the pins line up in that direction. You should be able to quickly see which pins are the problem pins.
    As in #3 ????. Read the whole post next time.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  8. #18
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    I'd be grateful if you'd indicate what pins pertain to which instructions on the pinout (see section 4).

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    As in #3 ????. Read the whole post next time.
    AO, I saw that, was just repeating it.
    Crazy old guy with a basement full of Pentium 1 laptops and parts

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