Image Map Image Map
Page 5 of 14 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 133

Thread: Operating System compatibility on early x86-32 chips

  1. Default

    1ST1: yeah those processors are of course capable to run linux. however, the linux on the graph is relatively new (debian 7 is from like 2013 and debian 8 is from 2015).
    When we observe compatibility, older linux distributions and newer linux distributions are similar to older and newer windows versions - so old windows and old linux distributions support older hardware. Newer versions of windows and linux only supporting newer hardware, and removing the support for older hardware. From the images above, it can be assumed that debian 7 is the last popular linux distribution that supports 486/5x86 class computers, and the Debian 8 is the last that supports Pentium Pro/Pentium 1/6x86MX+/K6/2 class computers.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    2,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Geri View Post
    Debian 8 is the last that supports Pentium Pro/Pentium 1/6x86MX+/K6/2 class computers.
    Why are you lumping the Pentium Pro with those other CPUs? The Pentium Pro was the first P6 CPU and is based on the same architecture as the Pentium II/III/first three gens of Celeron/(mostly) Pentium M, etc. It has the dreaded CMOV instruction which is the thing that's usually the absolute dealbreaker for i686 Linux distributions. (It also supports PAE, another gamebreaker for older CPUs.)
    My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs

  3. Default

    Cyrix 6x86MX supports CMOV.

    The Cyrix 6x86 and the Cyrix 6x86MX is very different processor. You are right aboug the pae, thats not supported on the 6x86MX.
    It seems the K6/2 dont have the CMOV, only the K6/2+ and K6-3 cpu-s have it. Maybe i will have to make a new line for those.
    Maybe you are right, and i should not treat these CPU-s in an unified context.

  4. Default

    and i just did it

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,851

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Geri View Post
    What do you mean by bypassing? You need a specific boot switch?
    The Windows 9x installer has command line switches to bypass certain checks of the system and allow it to install. There's one for hardware, another for RAM and a few more to bypass certain things like check disk, startup disk creation, etc.

    I haven't messed with Windows 98 in years so I don't know what the switches are anymore.

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    The Windows 9x installer has command line switches to bypass certain checks of the system and allow it to install. There's one for hardware, another for RAM and a few more to bypass certain things like check disk, startup disk creation, etc.

    I haven't messed with Windows 98 in years so I don't know what the switches are anymore.
    Aha, so the operating system itself does not needs special switches, only the installer, right?

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SE MI
    Posts
    4,490
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Geri View Post
    Aha, so the operating system itself does not needs special switches, only the installer, right?
    https://www.computerhope.com/win95set.htm
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    2,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Geri View Post
    Maybe you are right, and i should not treat these CPU-s in an unified context.
    The Pentium Pro is literally the same microarchitecture as the Pentium II minus support for MMX. Whatever the other companies' processors support is kind of irrelevant.
    My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eudimorphodon View Post
    The Pentium Pro is literally the same microarchitecture as the Pentium II minus support for MMX. Whatever the other companies' processors support is kind of irrelevant.
    i dont see your point then, the pentium pro had a separate line in the table from the beginning, from the pentium and pentium2.
    at the same time, they belong to the same era, its not strange to list them in one sentence even if some of those chips lack one or two instructions.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    2,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Geri View Post
    i dont see your point then, the pentium pro had a separate line in the table from the beginning, from the pentium and pentium2.
    at the same time, they belong to the same era, its not strange to list them in one sentence even if some of those chips lack one or two instructions.
    I am specifically underlining, again, that your statement that "Debian 8 is the last that supports Pentium Pro/Pentium 1/6x86MX+/K6/2 class computers" is based on some flawed assumptions with how you've been lumping CPUs together in the specific context of Linux. Yes, the Pentium Pro is older than many CPUs that are specifically not supported by "i686 Linux" chronologically (it went on sale before the Pentium MMX did), but it is specifically, by definition, a P6 CPU, and in linux-speak "i686" means a "Pentium Pro or higher". Some Socket 7 CPUs have CMOV, but no Socket 7 supports PAE. Every post-Pentium Pro CPU (other than the P5-dirived models like the Pentium MMX) by Intel does with one partial exception: the first rev of Pentium M's didn't *say* they supported it in the CPUID, but they actually will run a PAE kernel; it's a cosmetic bug that they added a boot variable to the Linux kernel to work around.
    My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •