Image Map Image Map
Page 8 of 14 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 133

Thread: Operating System compatibility on early x86-32 chips

  1. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    One of the reasons that I keep a couple of NetBSD installation disks around--it'll pretty much run on anything later than an 80386.
    freebsd vs netbsd vs openbsd
    what are the main differences, in perspective of retro computing and usability?

  2. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    FYI

    I just now reached into my crypt and found Red Hat Ubuntu 5.2 on a 3.5" floppy. It booted up on a Super 7 with a K6-2/533 and 256M of RAM with no problems. Didn't install to HD however.
    thankyou, thats interesting, but its probably less usefull than msdos 1.0 unless you dont want to do anything ever than running irc and ftp server, the pre 2010 linux world is horrible, except maybe suse 10.1 which *probably* requires pae if i recall correctly, so it will not run on the socket7 world.

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Principality of Xeon W-2140B the Great State of Central New Jerky
    Posts
    1,740

    Default

    Sorry to sidetrack the thread, but was there any version of Linux that ran a gui on a 386?

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    33,672
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Geri View Post
    freebsd vs netbsd vs openbsd
    what are the main differences, in perspective of retro computing and usability?
    NetBSD is what you use when you want to run BSD on some antique bit of hardware, such as a VAX. "Of course it runs NetBSD" is their slogan.
    FreeBSD tends to be more application-intensive, being the basis for Apple's Darwin and the Sony Playstation.
    OpenBSD pretty much tends to be security-intensive for servers. It's pretty much responsible for the introduction of OpenSSH, for example. Code is tightly controlled and vetted.

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Western North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    1,288

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    Sorry to sidetrack the thread, but was there any version of Linux that ran a gui on a 386?
    Yes. Soft Landing Systems included X11. Early Slackware, early Debian, early SuSE, and early Red Hat Linux (the Mothers Day release) did as well.
    --
    Thus spake Tandy Xenix System III version 3.2: "Bughlt: Sckmud Shut her down Scotty, she's sucking mud again!"

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,857

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eudimorphodon View Post
    Re: the Pentium Pro, who even has a working one to test anymore?
    Socket 8 motherboards are getting harder to come by. I've had two 200 MHz Pentium Pros I pulled from a dead Acer server about 20 years ago, but no board to use them in.

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    Sorry to sidetrack the thread, but was there any version of Linux that ran a gui on a 386?
    the gui system in linux is just a program suit (called X11 which is the driver and api package, and a random window manager that creates decorations).
    this is not part of the kernel, ist just literally a few programs - once the kernel boots, you can run x11 and all the programs in theory (they must be compiled with march=i386 tho).

  8. #78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eudimorphodon View Post
    Re: the Pentium Pro, who even has a working one to test anymore? I would venture a guess that OS support for it would probably be less of an issue than it is for a random Socket 7 board (especially if it's a later model that uses the common 440FX chipset) but it's certainly still a possibility that you'd run into some issue that had nothing to do with the CPU proper.
    I have an operational dual PPro 233 system, it's my primary retro gaming machine actually. I'd be willing to test anything that can boot from a Live CD

  9. #79
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    2,048

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maxtherabbit View Post
    I have an operational dual PPro 233 system, it's my primary retro gaming machine actually. I'd be willing to test anything that can boot from a Live CD
    First off: cool!

    I guess the obvious thing to try would be the latest Debian "Buster"; if that boots then I'd say it's very unlikely any previous version has an issue with it. Here's the links for the LiveCD ISOs; it does look like they're DVD sized, is that an issue?

    One thing I will mention is the last time I tried to install Linux on a mid-1990's vintage machine (A Dolch portable with a Pentium-non-MMX 200mhz) I discovered that although the BIOS did have a boot-from-CD option it didn't work with most "modern" CDs. (Tried several different Linux CDs and Windows XP, and none of them would boot on its funky BIOS implementation. The only thing that worked was a NetBSD CD.) I ended up installing an Intel PXE network card and booting the network installer. I don't know if it's possible the BIOS in your Pentium Pro might pose any issues with a modern LiveCD.
    My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs

  10. #80

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eudimorphodon View Post
    First off: cool!

    I guess the obvious thing to try would be the latest Debian "Buster"; if that boots then I'd say it's very unlikely any previous version has an issue with it. Here's the links for the LiveCD ISOs; it does look like they're DVD sized, is that an issue?

    One thing I will mention is the last time I tried to install Linux on a mid-1990's vintage machine (A Dolch portable with a Pentium-non-MMX 200mhz) I discovered that although the BIOS did have a boot-from-CD option it didn't work with most "modern" CDs. (Tried several different Linux CDs and Windows XP, and none of them would boot on its funky BIOS implementation. The only thing that worked was a NetBSD CD.) I ended up installing an Intel PXE network card and booting the network installer. I don't know if it's possible the BIOS in your Pentium Pro might pose any issues with a modern LiveCD.
    I've booted off many modern DVDs on this machine and it contains a late model IDE DVD drive, should be no issue.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •