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Thread: PC case rust repair

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    It's not a Poppy.
    LOL that is understandably funny. Well, I want one anyway.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by VERAULT View Post
    There need to be more 3d imaging devices that can render these things into appropriate files for 3d printing... Retrobrite... not to retrobrite.. it doesnt matter they are at end of life.. decay is already set in.
    Plastic can be remelted. If you had the original dies, you could melt down a bezel, case or whatever, shoot it into the mold, and what came out would be like brand new. Certain plastics anyway. I was thinking likewise the cracked surfaces, I've never seen this but presumably the cracks are very small, could be "healed" by the reapplication of heat.

  3. #13
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    You first. When you succeed in preserving plastics, be sure to notify the Guggenheim and other museums with plastic artworks that desperately need preserving. The problem with a lot of old plastics is that binders have degraded and plasticizers have outgassed. 30-year old ABS is not particularly recyclable.

  4. #14
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    In general if it can be melted, it can be remelted. I imagine in cases if subatances are depleted, they can be replaced? No one is going to melt down computer case components, that wasn't the point. My thinking was surface defects can be smoothed over so to speak. Whether by application of heat or solvents.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    You first. When you succeed in preserving plastics, be sure to notify the Guggenheim and other museums with plastic artworks that desperately need preserving. The problem with a lot of old plastics is that binders have degraded and plasticizers have outgassed. 30-year old ABS is not particularly recyclable.
    Yes i would imagine thats its no longer viable either.

  6. #16
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    Anyone with some of the late 80s self-destructing Apple gear might learn something. I tossed a perfectly good Apple color monitor because the case would spontaneously shed bits of itself with no one around. Come to think of it, I owned a Volvo turbobrick whose interior plastics did the same thing...

  7. #17
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    Did you try melting any of those bits?

  8. #18
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    Has anyone else ever given serious thought to using vinyl dye as a better alternative solution to painting or retrobrighting? The biggest problem of course is colour matching the plastic but there are automotive paint shops I've found which offer this service.

    I've only ever tried it with an off the shelf spray can brought from an automative store to paint a hard drive cover to match the original drive bay colour. To the naked eye it was almost a perfect match (see photo). Worked brillantly as unlike normal paint it's pretty hard to stuff up and once dry it will not scratch off due to the fact it seeps into the surface and effectively changes the colour of the plastic. I've always wondered since then if this would be a risk free way of retrobrighting/repainting without all the downsides to both methods.

    IMG_20151010_135134.jpg
    AtariPC.net
    Atari PC | IBM Compatible Series

  9. #19
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    With what? Solvent? That turned the bits to crumbly granules. If you've followed my posts through the years, you'd know that I'm a big proponent of solvent cements in place of glue. Some stuff just doesn't have sufficient structural integrity after all of the volatiles have disappeared and the bonds start breaking.

  10. #20
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    Perhaps a solvent. As a precursor to actual melting some constituents may need to be added back in. I'm not claiming to be an expert, just putting stuff out there. In theory anything can be ground up and slathered onto something with a binder. Some modelmakers do this. A solvent is ideal as it reduces the plastic to goo then evaporates. But an adhesive could work also.

    @Joe, never heard of vinyl dye. With paint though if you thin it to the consistency of milk nearly, oil based paints anyway, it goes on and adheres tightly to a surface, obscuring the surface minimally. Some colors vary in opaqueness though (that a word?). In some instances it may make more sense to blot or dab paint on.

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