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Thread: Motherboard corrosion repair questions and advice

  1. #21
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    The battery-on-board was prevalent in third-party stuff even before the 5170. Consider the original Quadram Quadboard, for example.

  2. #22

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    Why are you guys so afraid of board repair?

    most of these old systems DO NOT have multi layer PCBs... so you only have visable traces to work with, and more often than not these boards can be easily repaired with jumper wires.

    this equipment is RARE AND EXPENSIVE these days, so for many of us buying damaged hardware and repairing it is the only thing we can do.

    sure it takes practice and time, But almost every PC in my collection i'd had to repair on the component level. I Am NOT a professional, nor am I particularly good at soldering, But I've manged to repair several board with just a basic Cheap Canadian Tire soldering iron and a few hours of my time.





    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRVZC8z2fJE&t=958s

    I have been inspired by this youtuber, and I've learned so much. and isn't that at least half the fun? for me the MAJOR reason I collect this stuff is I love repairing and maintaining this old hardware. (I'm a mechanic by trade and love 80s cars)

    besides, as this retro hardware becomes more and more rare, it's important to save this stuff rather than just junk it because "it's too difficult" I see that as a challenge, anyone has any "beyond repair" motherboards they wanna send my way? I'd be more than happy to give it a try. Heck I've even gotten pretty good at doing radial head alignment on 5.25" drives... why? because i couldn't afford to just keep buying drives on eBay hoping one would work. I had to learn how to repair them.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkdonut666 View Post
    anyone has any "beyond repair" motherboards they wanna send my way? I'd be more than happy to give it a try.
    I've got a few. Some 286, 386 and 486. But most of them are multilayer boards anyway and the shipping to Canada is so high that it probably would cost more than it's worth to ship both ways.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    I've got a few. Some 286, 386 and 486. But most of them are multilayer boards anyway and the shipping to Canada is so high that it probably would cost more than it's worth to ship both ways.
    I meant as an alternative to junking them, so there would be no return trip

    besides, shipping sucks but i'm used to it, I have to import almost all my vintage computer crap from either the USA or (former) USSR.

    really multi-layer PCBs? I don't know of a single machine i have older than a Pentium with a multi layer PCB... weird.

  5. #25
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    Some progress on the board. Bought contact cleaner and 320 grit sandpaper and the contacts for the I/O headers (floppy, serial, and parallel), along with the keyboard port (back of it) and the AT PSU header, then sprayed the items in question for the areas and they look a lot better. I also cleaned the EEPROM chip and the socket more and looks great.

    Only things I need are the jumper settings so that I can set the CPU to 100MHz and figure out if a 5V CPU is supported (shows 4V, 3.6V, 3.45V, and 3.3V between the two ISA slots).

    I am unable to find anything online for the jumpers and things.

  6. #26

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    Is this the correct motherboard documentation?

    https://stason.org/TULARC/pc/motherb...6-IH4077D.html

  7. #27
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    Almost similar to the board, except the IH4077H has a UMC UM8498F northbridge that has the keyboard controller integrated, 2nd IDE port, and the jumpers are by the CPU and some of them are marked for which one controls the FSB, voltage of the CPU (4V, 3.6V, 3.45V, and 3.3V) between ISA slot #5 and #6 (bottom two slots).
    Current retro systems:
    Commodore 64 Breadbin 250407 Rev. C
    Packard Bell Pack-Mate 28 Plus
    Toshiba Satellite Pro 410CDT, 2x IBM ThinkPad 380D (TFT and DSTN)
    iMac G3/600 Graphite, iMac G4/800 Lampshade
    YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RetroPCUser

  8. #28
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    Oct 2017
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    SE Michigan, USA
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    Well, the board has low voltage (no -12VDC or +12VDC coming from the PSU, although the PSU works in the Pentium 100 system) and it could be either the capacitors or a short somewhere.
    Current retro systems:
    Commodore 64 Breadbin 250407 Rev. C
    Packard Bell Pack-Mate 28 Plus
    Toshiba Satellite Pro 410CDT, 2x IBM ThinkPad 380D (TFT and DSTN)
    iMac G3/600 Graphite, iMac G4/800 Lampshade
    YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RetroPCUser

  9. #29

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    What does that board use 12V for?
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    SE Michigan, USA
    Posts
    575

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    ISA and VLB, I believe. And some cards require +12VDC in order for the cards to work correctly, EEPROM chips use +12VDC for power, and there are other things as well. I need to do more research on the +12VDC line.
    Current retro systems:
    Commodore 64 Breadbin 250407 Rev. C
    Packard Bell Pack-Mate 28 Plus
    Toshiba Satellite Pro 410CDT, 2x IBM ThinkPad 380D (TFT and DSTN)
    iMac G3/600 Graphite, iMac G4/800 Lampshade
    YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RetroPCUser

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