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Thread: Unitron clone case

  1. #1
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    Default Unitron clone case

    I recently bought the guts of a 'Peach' clone vintagecomputermuseum had up on ebay for a long time. He had it up for a few years at $399 with no takers and then parted it out and sold the case. Not sure why someone would ask him to tear down a complete machine just for the case but whatever. I got the rest of it for a decent price, but obviously no case.

    On the off chance someone has one.. I'd be interested in buying.

    Many thanks

  2. #2
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    In the interim you could use a pc case and create your own custom Apple II clone.

    Obviously someone needed a case. Just like you do. Schmott, no?

    I had an Apple II clone case that I held onto for a while then sold. Sorry.

    Maybe you could scam a real Apple II case, dead unit or guts removed.

    Or go to a 3d print shop.

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    I don't know why people buy stuff from vintagecomputermuseum, since the guy is in it just to make quick bucks (and his stuff is severely overpriced anyways.)
    I have a clone case lying around, but shipping to Canada is going to be enormous from US side.

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    Doing an image search for Unitron Apple II clones seems to at least hint that Unitron used a range of cases for their products. Some of them seem to have exactly the same case as my "Syscom-2" clone, which is a pretty close visual clone for a real II, while others used cases that took a keyboard with a number pad... by any chance do you have a picture of what a "Peach" specifically looked like? (Searching for that specifically didn't seem to turn up an obvious candidate.)

    My Syscom-2 has the opposite problem, in that its original guts have been replaced by a real Apple II motherboard. Not that it's a big deal, really, the clone board was practically identical.
    My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eudimorphodon View Post
    Doing an image search for Unitron Apple II clones seems to at least hint that Unitron used a range of cases for their products. Some of them seem to have exactly the same case as my "Syscom-2" clone, which is a pretty close visual clone for a real II, while others used cases that took a keyboard with a number pad... by any chance do you have a picture of what a "Peach" specifically looked like? (Searching for that specifically didn't seem to turn up an obvious candidate.)

    My Syscom-2 has the opposite problem, in that its original guts have been replaced by a real Apple II motherboard. Not that it's a big deal, really, the clone board was practically identical.
    Here's the original auction. To my eye it looks exactly the same as my 'Linden' clone, which is also a Unitron.

    I am, looking at it now, realizing that I may be making some assumptions. The keyboard is definitely Unitron, but the motherboard bears no Unitron markings and has a different color and power connector than my Unitron board. Might be an earlier one, or might not be unitron at all.

    It's never been clear to me if marques like "Linden" and "Peach" were just 'housebrand' labels for retailers or actual companies that sold these to many places. I sort of think they were the former - as a means to skip around the import bans Apple had Customs slap on them. Probably easier to ship 'replacement motherboard' than a complete, Apple II-like computer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dorkbert View Post
    I don't know why people buy stuff from vintagecomputermuseum, since the guy is in it just to make quick bucks (and his stuff is severely overpriced anyways.)
    I have a clone case lying around, but shipping to Canada is going to be enormous from US side.
    I only buy from him when he does actual auctions (which hopefully he doesn't shill bid on). They turn out to be reasonable. I wanted to 'save' this machine from being parted out but didn't realize he'd already ditched the case.

    He's definitely a buck maker - and a little bit shady with his descriptions. My favourite is 'minimal testing has been done'. If he had actually done that, he'd know this clone board wasn't working at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by falter View Post
    I am, looking at it now, realizing that I may be making some assumptions. The keyboard is definitely Unitron, but the motherboard bears no Unitron markings and has a different color and power connector than my Unitron board. Might be an earlier one, or might not be unitron at all.

    It's never been clear to me if marques like "Linden" and "Peach" were just 'housebrand' labels for retailers or actual companies that sold these to many places. I sort of think they were the former - as a means to skip around the import bans Apple had Customs slap on them. Probably easier to ship 'replacement motherboard' than a complete, Apple II-like computer.
    It's not a great picture in that auction, but my gut feeling is the motherboard at least isn't from Unitron, given that if there's one thing that seems to be at all consistent when it comes to Unitron it seems to be that they liked using bright blue PCB board materials. The case is your typical bog-standard Apple II clone case, pretty much the same profile as Syscom-II My guess is the "Peach" was probably always a mongrel assembled by some small mail-order reseller out of parts acquired from sketchy back-of-the-magazine ads. These cases and the compatible motherboards were being churned out in at least Taiwan and Korea in pretty substantial numbers for years, and it looks like Unitron (which was based in Brazil, if I recall?) may also have been selling parts internationally because I've seen references to people finding things like their language cards in real Apple IIs.

    I hope you didn't pay $299 for those guts without the case, that would seem pretty excessive.
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    that looked like a run of the mill clone. all the mom and pa shops in taiwan must've made hundreds thousand of those in the 80s.
    the cases I have are for keyboard with numeric keypad. I think there are at least two patterns for those.
    there are really only a handful of companies making cases; while it's simple to manufacture two layer motherboards, it cost serious bucks to cut steel mould for injection plastic cases.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dorkbert View Post
    that looked like a run of the mill clone. all the mom and pa shops in taiwan must've made hundreds thousand of those in the 80s.
    the cases I have are for keyboard with numeric keypad. I think there are at least two patterns for those.
    there are really only a handful of companies making cases; while it's simple to manufacture two layer motherboards, it cost serious bucks to cut steel mould for injection plastic cases.
    There are good pics of the board here

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