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Thread: Trying to decide upgrade direction for PC

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by falter View Post
    Mainly where I'm running into trouble is editing with Premiere. I've upgraded to the subscription version but my machine can't even handle basic editing with proxy enabled without stuttering and crashing at random intervals.
    My recommendation would be to go Ryzen, probably the Ryzen7 3700 or 3800, and then throw in a GTX-1060 or higher so you have access to the Cuda acceleration in Premier. This would be your best bang for the buck when it comes to video editing, and will outperform most Intel Core i7 machines out there at ~60% the cost. RAM wise, get the fastest RAM your budget and board would support, and IMO more than 32Gb would be a waste.

    Not only would that config get you a damned good machine for Premiere, you also end up with a solid general use machine that can do some decent gaming on the occasion that you want to do so.

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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by lutiana View Post
    My recommendation would be to go Ryzen, probably the Ryzen7 3700 or 3800, and then throw in a GTX-1060 or higher so you have access to the Cuda acceleration in Premier.
    CUDA support in Premiere, as of Premiere Pro 2020, doesn't accelerate h.264 or h.265 encoding or decoding. It only supports editing operations (compositing, scaling, and filters). Because of this, an AMD CPU would need at least 16 cores/32 threads to account for the missing acceleration.
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  3. #23
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    Though if the benchmarks are to be trusted, don't go for the maximum core CPU from AMD. The almost $4,000 64 core model is about 5% slower than the approximately $2,000 32 core model. I am guessing that the limitations on memory are being run into; I have not seen Premiere benchmarks involving the 64 core server lineup with the higher maximum memory.

  4. #24
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    I guess it boils down to are you doing this for a side hobby or is this machine dedicated to video editing? i7/i9 CPUs can use Quicksync in premiere Pro (which is just the built in GPU in the CPU) to encode H.265 up to a specific bitrate which is an advantage over just brute force CPU encoding. Sooner or later you will be able to get a plugin that allows other GPUs to do h.265 encoding if they are not out already.
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  5. #25
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    "Well you can choose between slightly older lga1366 or newer lga2066 or lha3647. If you shop around on ebay you can find lga1366 mobos that support ddr3 or ddr4. If you're adventurous and don't mind getting your hands dirty you could go that route."

    Not lga1366, but rather lga2011. Having obtained an lga2066 cpu that outperforms many dual 2011 setups, I don't know what would be the point. I didn't spend anymore, perhaps less. Dual cpu machines are still way cool. But if you're not building something very current, you're probably better off buying some used bargain.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    I guess it boils down to are you doing this for a side hobby or is this machine dedicated to video editing? i7/i9 CPUs can use Quicksync in premiere Pro (which is just the built in GPU in the CPU) to encode H.265 up to a specific bitrate which is an advantage over just brute force CPU encoding. Sooner or later you will be able to get a plugin that allows other GPUs to do h.265 encoding if they are not out already.
    It's pretty much a side hobby. I've been making a few videos for youtube, and have just been having fun experimenting with things like lighting, effects, etc. I'm not looking to make a career out of it. I'm just not having fun with this machine glitching out and operating at a snails pace.

  7. #27
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    Then my recommendation still stands.
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